Skip to content

Posts Under wisdom: knowing yourself Category

Success Redefined

Posted November 16, 2014

Success Redefined by Rachel W Cole

Staredown

Being in control feels awesome.

Determining the outcome of things because we’re in control, double awesome.

When we feel in control, our nervous system is as calm as if we were a baby snuggled in our mother’s arms. Control feels safe and safe is where it’s at for many of us.

Unfortunately our sense of control, especially as it pertains to outcomes, is most often an illusion.

I know a thing or two about pursuing control. I spent a good chunk of my life white knuckling the steering wheel. I was in hot (and often rigid) pursuit of controlling my weight, other’s perceptions of me, and how successful I was at whatever endeavor I’d embarked on.

Perhaps you can relate.

Sadly, the tight grip I tried to have on everything–and everyone–didn’t produce the results I’d hoped.

My weight yo-yo’ed, people judged me, boyfriends left me, employers fired me. Try as I might, seeking to control the end game never seemed to work out for me.

These days I have a radically different approach.

I make choices about how I show up and what my boundaries are, releasing all outcome, as much as possible.

Success today is defined as whether or not I did my part, not whether a certain result came to be.

In my very real, and very imperfect life this looks like…

Practicing eating intuitively and releasing any control of my body’s weight.

Committing to showing up with my clients with presence, curiosity, and love. Releasing whether or not they’ll get anything out of working with me.

When I was single, this looked liked choosing how I wanted to show up on dates and releasing whether it went anywhere. Whether the outcome was rejection or a second date, success’ hat was hung on how I chose to show up.

In a relationship, this looks like a personal requirement that my partner and I do work with a couples therapist long before there are any major issues and releasing whether or not we’ll be together in 60 years. It looks like telling the truth, even if it’s not what he wants to hear because I want whatever outcome is the result of the truth.

This practice is entirely about having awareness and commitment of how we want to be in our lives.

I want to be honest. I want to be present. I want to be relaxed. I want to be compassionate. I want to allowed to be human. I want to be creative.

And I can play a part in all these things. I can play a major part in how I’m showing up.

I can’t however, determine or predict what will happen tomorrow around the bend. I don’t know how others will receive me or my work. There is so much I don’t know, and accepting that–living without attempting to be psychic–is freedom.

The impact of my being is not in my control and to chase it would be fruitless and exhausting. Of course, I only know this from the painful years I clung to controlling outcomes.

Something unseen in all this is the belief that I’m enough.

If I didn’t believe that I was enough I would still be chasing that through all the same old dead-end alley ways.

In my coaching practice I see this showing up when a client is utterly terrified of dating (while hungering for partnership). Terrified she’s being awkward or that she’ll be rejected. Terrified. The solution isn’t to avoid dating. The solution is to figure out what she can control and make that the definition of success.

This same phenomenon shows up when clients have career or creative hungers that paralyze them with fear. This is a sign that success (and safety) is defined as a certain outcome rather than simply the act of going for it with heart.

So I propose this:

If you’re exhausted from trying to control your weight, stop. Try instead to eat in a way that feels good, tastes good, and honors your body. If you can do that (and you can), what your body weighs will matter a whole lot less.

If there’s a creative project you’re pregnant with or a career move calling to you, play with defining success as trying something new, or as Brene Brown says, as getting into the arena.

Today, success for me is hitting publish on this post. It’s far from perfect. It might not even be useful to some people stopping by. But it’s honest and communicates something that has been liberating for me. And thankfully, my sense of my own enoughness doesn’t rest on these 700 words. And that feels way more awesome than being in control.

::::::::::::

Wisdom Notes for a Well-fed Holiday

Holiday Hungers

Posted November 5, 2014

Holiday Hungers from Rachel W Cole

Winter

I need a quiet thanksgiving for two, with braised turkey legs and twice baked sweet potatoes. And pie.

I need slightly over-full days of coaching, not because it’s easy right now, but because it’s just right.

I need to continue the pilgrimage I’m walking with my latest project. Long days, one after the other, picking my foot up and putting it down. Compass pointed toward a mecca of mine I’ve been wanting to reach for a long time.

I need a few stolen days of cuddles and laughter and making out, just enough to fuel the fire for the long trek.

I need time at my sewing machine because it’s the backbend to all of my many forward bends. Even if I hunch over it.

I need hard conversations. The kind that turn the universe on it’s head and demand fresh answers to unvisited questions.

I need people in my life who do what I don’t do as well. They the base of my pyramid, allowing me to reach higher.

I need tickles, given and received from a heart-on-wobbly-legs toddler.

I need candles that I’ve blessed, sesame oil on my skin, new perfume for a new chapter, and homemade minestrone.

I need stillness and alone time, married to tables wrapped in my favorite people.

I need a yoga practice that asks nothing more of my body than to show up and respond to what is felt.

I need to let love in. Truly. Open the doors, throw back the shutters and say, “Come in, it’s cold out there. Would you like a cup of tea?”

This is what I need this holiday season. What do you need?

::::::::::::

 wisdomnote.fbad.2

What you get

Posted October 20, 2014

What You Get by Rachel W Cole

Add a splash of gumption. Rinse, lather, repeat.

Taste Test

Posted September 21, 2014

tastebuds

Taste Buds

You can’t know what will feed you unless you taste it — and taste a lot of other things that don’t feed you.

And sometimes you need to taste something many times before you know if you like it, if you need it, and how much of it is supportive for you.

This will mean tasting things that don’t taste good.

This will mean tasting things that might make you ill.

This will mean tasting things that are almost right, but not quite (Hello, Goldilocks).

If you’re not sure what you are hungry for, start by tasting anything and allowing your wise body and heart to tell you what is satisfying.

This might mean trying out dating a wide range of people.

This might mean a career path that is anything but a straight line.

This might mean asking to sample all 31 flavors when you go for ice cream.

Wouldn’t it be a magical world if we already knew what was right for us before trying anything out, before making a mistake, before embarrassing ourselves, or ruffling any feathers, or hurting feelings, or ‘wasting’ time.

Nah. That world sounds bor-ing.

Tasting the full menu is one of the best parts of life. It allows us to feel grounded in knowing that what we’ve chosen is more right for us, in comparison to what we’ve let go.

When I look back on my life I see a woman who needed to taste some very icky, very off, and very painful things in order to learn what worked.

When you ask yourself “What was I doing back then (in my 20′s or 30′s…)? What was I doing with in that relationship? What was I doing in that dead end job?”

The answer to all of these questions is: “I was tasting.”

Seize your freedom to try new things that might feed you so you can discover what actually does.

Want to be a Well-Fed Woman?

Better get to tasting.

* Note: you can now click and highlight any line in this, or other, blog posts to create a customized tweet. Try it out!

The Fulfillment Pyramid

Posted July 29, 2014

Pleasure is a food group. I’ve been known to say this fairly often.

It’s a way I remind myself and my clients that things other than food go into making us healthy and well-fed.

While the USDA no longer promotes a food pyramid (I think it’s a circle now?), most Americans remember this popular illustration from our childhoods outlining the types of foods and number of daily servings our government claims is optimal.

Inspired by the pyramid’s iconic image, and also as a tongue-in-cheek jab at it, I created The Fulfillment Pyramid.

Instead of me telling you what and how much to ‘eat’, it’s blank.

It’s up to you to fill it out based on what you know about what feeds you.

There is a 2D and 3D version of the pyramid plus suggestions and instructions are provided in the kit, which is free, when you sign up for my newsletter list.

Below are lots of examples readers have sent to me of their Fulfillment Pyramids. I’d love to see yours.

This is a fun right-brained way to approach building your own well-fed life. It’s great to keep on your personal altar or bedside table—reminding to feast in ways that leave you feeling most alive.

If you already are on the list and missed the link to the kit, send me an email and I’ll resend it to you. If you’re not on the list, sign up over there on the side bar or at the bottom of this.

Ask yourself: “How many of my daily servings of pleasure have I gotten today?”

::::::::::::

5477694798_ee906f74ca_z

Aviary Photo_130336150899024033

Aviary Photo_130336150472482587

Pyramid-2

10844417233_0e0df0d640_z

5642675780_e319deba78_o

5642106303_76d653d2dc_o
Presentation1 5486760929_ae3e2b503b_z 5486450049_c8337292a1_z

5486345369_ff26e7eda1_z 5477096113_c1a66d25c9_z

We.

Posted July 9, 2014

we

I have never had a drinking problem. In fact, I’m a one drink woman because two puts me to sleep, but I had a therapist once plead with me to go an AA meeting.

She had spent months, maybe years, watching me spin inside my own illusion that my pain was somehow different, that my angst was somehow greater, and that no one could understand my personal hell, at least not without feeling a great deal of judgement towards me.

I was pretty far down the rabbit hole of separation. There was me and there was everyone else. Everyone else had it easier. Everyone else felt more at peace. Everyone else was lovable. Everyone else….everyone else…everyone else….but not me. not poor me.

There was you and there was me.

And none of you, could understand or relate to me or my pain.

So my therapist told me to go an AA meeting. She wanted me to sit in a room with other people, who just like me, suffered. People, who if I passed them in the grocery store aisle, I’d assume had it all together. People who both look like and not like me, but nevertheless feel the same feelings and worry the same worries.

I didn’t end up at an AA meeting, but I did end up in group therapy and the desired effect was just the same. And it was there that something fundamental shifted in me. For ten months, every week, I sat in a room with about ten other women all awash in their shame, their obsessions, their stuff. And it looked an awful lot like my own stuff.

Put simply: I woke up to our sameness. I woke up from the illusion that no one would-could understand the agony I experienced. I woke up from the idea that everyone else, but me, had it together.

Let’s go even further back in time…

At the height of my anorexia, more than a decade ago, I was leaving a dental appointment and stepped into the elevator to leave the building. I rode down with a woman whom I had never met—a stranger. She blatantly eyed my lithe frame up and down. Then said to me “Oooh girl, I only wish I had whatever willpower you’ve got.” Not even a week later I went to get a bikini wax, and laying there on the table, vulnerable, naked, and insecure the waxer said to me “You must work out, you have a perfect body.”

In both of these cases gave a pacifying half smile and I said nothing aloud. Yet inside I was screaming: “I don’t eat! You want the perfect body?! Stop eating! You think it’s willpower? No it’s soul-level terror!”

These women had made assumptions about me. They had placed themselves on one side of line and me on the other.  In their mind, they were fat. I was not. They had no willpower, I had it spades. They were lazy, I was on top of my game. They were wild pigs and I was smoothly in control.

Yes, there assumptions were wrong, but the point is that I was doing the same thing.

Me and my pain over here, everyone else over there.

And I needed to wake up. The separation was killing me. Literally.

Recently a client confessed that she had taken money from her office’s petty cash box. She’s paid it all back by now, but the shame of her actions still plagued her. While she seethed with self-judgement, I felt nothing but empathy and our shared humanity.

There isn’t any part of her that’s different than me. I’ve been lost. I’ve made choices that hurt other people. I’ve acted from insecurity. And while I consider myself a person with boatloads of integrity, if you went through my (or your) whole life with a fine tooth comb you could easily find where I’ve faltered.

Over the past six months I’ve noticed myself slip a bit into otherizing. It’s been a natural period of creative fallowness and incubation where it’s all too easy to look at other people who are in creative flow and think, once again, that they are somehow better than me. Them over there, me over here.

This matters to me because when I’m lost in this place I feel half alive, half connected, half of service, and half myself. I know that each of us is here to serve by being full and whole, not dimmed to a mere fifty percent.

I’m naming my own otherizing here for myself and for you, should you find yourself drawing this unhelpful line in the sand.

There is no human experience that we have alone. It’s up to each of us to tear town the chambers of isolation that comparison and fear build.

It’s just you and me, them and us—all together.

That person you idolize. That internet guru. That person you loathe. The bully from high-school. The person on the front of this week’s tabloids. The one who beat you out for that job. The suitor who liked you, that you didn’t like back. The noisy neighbor and the perfect-from-the-outside acquaintance. The criminal and do-gooder. Yep, all of us. Our pains and sorrows. Anxieties and dilemmas. Joys and callings. Sacred reverberating essences.

We.

Say it with me: WE.

:::::::::::

Here’s a wonderful and related TED talk from Elizabeth Lesser:

 

The Pendulum

Posted June 16, 2014

pendulum

Pendulum Series 1 of 3

Jailbreaking

This is how I’ve spent much of the past seven months.

While leading six crazy-courageous groups of women through reading and implementing Intuitive Eating, and many of those women through an additional 10-week alumni intensive, I have become a professional jailbreaker.

At the heart of this work is illuminating something I call The Pendulum and then shepherding the participants to often hard to find off-ramp.

The Pendulum

The Pendulum is the seemingly never-ending ride between some form of a restrictive state of mind and overconsumption state of mind. A say ‘state of mind’ here and not ‘behaviors’ because we need only psychologically restrict or overconsume to experience the tortuous ride. That is to say that feeling restricted or believing we have overconsumed is far more significant than behaving either way. The mind is a tricky thing. Certainly, we can (and often do) behave these ways, but it isn’t necessary in order to perpetuate The Pendulum and feel the inevitable mental distress that comes with the back and forth swing.

And back and forth we swing.

Restriction.

Overconsumption.

Restriction.

Overconsumption.

These two phases of the cycle manifest in a broad array of ways, but all with the same two flavors.

On the one side we feel in control, high even. Above our hungers and with a sense of calm.

On the flip side we’re in chaos, often experiencing some level of shame and self-loathing. We feel out of control.

You probably already know much of this. After all, this is human nature.

We’re hard wired to react to one swing of The Pendulum with the other. (Read: this is not your fault.)

I’m talking about food here, but this is a universal law of energy and applies to many other aspects of our lives.

Back and forth. Restrict. Overconsume. Feeling like we’re being ‘good’ only to be feel that we’re ‘bad’.

Sometimes minute by minute, hour by hour, or month by month. The time between swings isn’t important. What matters is that we can’t cheat The Pendulum. We can’t game the system. As human beings we’re wired to swing one way if we swing the other.

Unless we step off the ride.

The Off Ramp

Every pendulum has a center point. We must pass through this point on our way from one swing to the other.

We can stop the ride if we can only just slow the momentum and rest in that center point.

We do this by meeting the ride with compassion and nonjudgmental observation, this makes it much easier to slow the swing.

We do this by meeting the moment post-overconsumption with a conscious choice to return to the center (i.e. reject restriction).

We do this by returning to our body. The Pendulum swings are perpetuated by an override of our body’s preferences. The off ramp is found when we decide to cease the override.

Again, the polarity of the ride is hard wired into us. We often think that it is our own failing that leads us to over consume, but rather it is our beautiful and human need to both find soothing and avoid famine (real or psychological) that leads us to the ride.

Real Life

So what does this look like in real life?

It looks like getting clear on your own unique tendencies toward restriction and overconsumption. It looks like getting to know your triggers and the fears and stories that fuel your ride.

Do you tend to restrict certain types of food? Do you restrict eating at certain times of day? Or is it about limiting quantity?

Where do you find yourself most often past the point of comfortable fullness? When do you find yourself feeling like you need to ‘recommit’ to whatever ‘plan’ or ‘program’ or ‘rules’ you identify with?

Identifying our patterns can be tricky as they are often subtle and entirely socially condoned. You can usually sniff them out by following the thread of where you feel guilty around food.

Draw Your Pendulum

Take a piece of paper and a pen. Draw your pendulum. On the left half write out all the ways you see yourself restricting. On the right half write out all the ways you find yourself overconsuming. Again, these can be restrictive or over consumptive thoughts and fixations, not just behaviors. Track your own pendulum swings. Use arrows. Note your flow. Observe how one sets off a chain reaction that leads back to the other.

Bottom Line

If you’re tired of the back and forth, commit to returning to center as often as it takes. (It took me a solid two years of practice) Commit to taking the off ramp as often as you’re able to. Commit to paying loving attention. Commit to not blaming yourself for The Pendulum and accepting that it’s part of how our species operates. Commit to restrict nothing but restriction itself. Commit to using common sense instead of sensationalism when it comes to what to eat. Commit to choosing happiness over thinness. Commit to choosing real life instead of chasing perfection. Commit to being smarter than the false promises of restriction. Commit to breaking yourself out of jail.

Freedom is possible and it’s worth committing to it’s pursuit.

A time for everything

Posted May 12, 2014

 poison

Poison Apple

“Poison and medicine are often the same thing, given in different proportions”

Alice Sebold

One of the most common traits (and pitfalls) I see is dichotomous thinking – or seeing everything as either black or white.

There is a frenzy to our lives. A striving, masculine energy to achieve, improve, and purify.

Many of the women I work with come to me when they can no longer bare the tightrope walk their life has become. Slaving in pursuit of being ‘good’, being ‘liked’, and being ‘beautiful’.

But life isn’t a tightrope walk, unless we make it that.

Nothing is good or bad, unless we name it that.

Green vegetables and white sugar are not opposites, nor are they enemies.

Everything is everything, depending on the circumstances. Depending on where we are standing and what is needed now.

I’m calling out for less purity and more messy holding of both. Less pigeon holing. Less throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

This requires paying attention.

When we think in binaries, we get to sleepwalk through life. We decide ahead of time which category something fits into and we live accordingly. No need to reevaluate, it’s all already been decided.

Doritos? Toxic.

Meditation? Saintly.

Real Housewives of Anywhere? Pathetic waste of time.

Homemade food? Holy.

And on and on.

If we could use our Martha Stewart label makers on life, I’m sure we would.

But life isn’t black or white. It’s every shade of gray, and pink, and green, and yellow that can be found. And those colors change moment by moment.

This requires we pay attention. This requires we get comfortable with an unlabeled life.

There is a time for everything,

and a season for every activity under the heavens:

a time to be born and a time to die,

a time to plant and a time to uproot,

a time to kill and a time to heal,

a time to tear down and a time to build,

a time to weep and a time to laugh,

a time to mourn and a time to dance,

a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them,

a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,

a time to search and a time to give up,

a time to keep and a time to throw away,

a time to tear and a time to mend,

a time to be silent and a time to speak,

a time to love and a time to hate,

a time for war and a time for peace.

:: Ecclesiastes

and I’ll add…

There is a time for Facebook and a time for being miles away from a screen.

There is a time for zafu cushions and a time to find stillness in the least likely place.

No one thing is arbitrarily better than another.

If you want to know if something is medicine or poison you must listen.

Your heart will tell you. Is it soft?

Your lungs will tell you. Are they tight?

Your flesh will you you. Is it supple?

If you listen.

Sensations of ease, joy, enoughness, and vitality are signs of a medicine.

Sensations of deadness, contraction, and insecurity are signs of poison.

Right now, not yesterday or last year, what’s your medicine?

Today, mine is shaved legs and a new sundress. Offering myself sustainably.  Crisp and cold caesar salad. Haim’s The Wire. Writing only when I have something to say.

And you? What’s your medicine? What’s your poison?

Pleasuary

Posted February 8, 2014

pleasuary

Pure Pleasure

Last year my boyfriend declared February to be Pleasuary.

Lucky me, he has declared this to be an annual tradition.

Pleasuary, if it’s not clear from it’s name, is an entire month dedicated to pleasure.

There’s no real reason this needs to take place during February, although Pluly or Pleptember just doesn’t sound nearly as fun.

If you’re inspired to join me in celebrating Pleasuary here are a few pointers:

Giving vs Receiving

Pleasuary is perfect for those in a relationship where one person tends to be the giver and the other tends to be the receiver. For heterosexual couples, it is often the woman who tends to give and the man who tends to receive. If you relate to this dynamic, allow yourself to shift the natural order things for the month. Wear a new groove.

Try this: Make a pact. For the month of Pleasuary your job is to receive. Their job is to give. Rest into it. It might feel awkward. It will most certainly feel good.

If you’re single, decide that you’re going up the pleasure you give yourself and instead of feeling guilty about this, set the intention to truly receive what is given.

Feeling Safe vs Feeling Alive

Feeling good comes from so many different sources and there are infinite shades of good feelings. It’s important to differentiate between the good feelings that come from being comforted and the good feelings that can come from being outside our comfort zone.  Of course, we need a base line of feeling safe if we’re to dip our toe in more enlivening waters, but there is much pleasure to be experienced outside of our bubble of safety.

Try this: In your journal, brainstorm two lists: things that make you feel comforted and safe AND things that make you feel ecstatic, alive, and deeply pleasured. Then circle a few from each side that you want to make happen this month.

Quality and Quantity

This month is about both, quantity and quality. It’s about making pleasure part of the everyday. Upping the pleasure at breakfast. Upping the pleasure in our work. Upping the pleasure in the mundane and the extraordinary.

Try this: Make a list of 30 (or more) ways you want to receive pleasure and be about checking them off the list. Of course,  spontaneity is also part of this so don’t let a checklist keep you from new and sudden bursts of pleasure receiving.

In terms of quality of pleasure, this is the result of deep and open presence. Even thirty seconds of pleasure can be knee shaking if we are truly present. High quality pleasure is like fine cheese or good chocolate, the experience is so much more satisfying. A little goes a long way when we allow ourselves to drop into receiving and the sensations of feeling good.

Try this: Set aside time to turn off all electronics. Tune into your body. Pleasuary is an adventure of discovering what exactly gives you pleasure. And, it’s important to know that you don’t have to know right now. In fact, you most certainly don’t know all the ways that you can experience pleasure. Play a sort of ‘Marco Polo’ pleasure game where simply allowing yourself (and your partner) to go towards what’s ‘warm’ and away from what’s ‘cold’.

Sense-uality & Indulgence

Pleasuary is not wholly about knocking boots. Pleasuary is about attunement of the senses to good feelings and expanding our capacity for pleasure.

Try this: List all the ways you might experience pleasure through your different five senses then attempt to saturate yourself with pleasure from all of these entry points.

The definition of indulge is to “allow oneself the experience of pleasure.” On that note, if you’re game for the Pleasuary, go indulge! Soak it in. Green light your enjoyment. Hand out the permission slips. Decide to taste, smell, touch, listen, and see it fully.

Happy Pleasuary!

 ::::::::::::

If you’re wanting more pleasure and enjoyed this post you can read more of my thoughts on feeling good in P is for Pleasure

Just say it.

Posted January 20, 2014

Like clockwork, on the full moon, I have insomnia.

This past week when the sky was aglow and the lunar calendar was turning over a page I had an urge to listen to spoken word poetry.

From about two a.m. to five I drank up some of the most stirring orations I’ve ever heard. I love this slam-ing medium of communication. It feels like a river that runs below our surface of striving. When a spoken word poet hits their flow the performance piece fades away and it’s just raw, rolling emotive breath and sound.

Here are a group of talented, brave poetic women just saying it. Perhaps it’ll keep you company during your next moon-lit awakening.

Whoa line: “…still hoping that the mortician finds us fuckable and attractive…”

Whoa line: “…deny myself the right to be shown myself…”

Whoa line: “…Eve was made naked, no makeup, no weave…”

Whoa line: “…The body is not to be prayed for, it’s to be prayed to…”

Whoa line: “…’cause there is nothing more beautiful than the way the ocean refuses to stop kissing the shoreline no matter how many times it’s sent away.”

Whoa line: “Dear Cosmo: Fuck you! I will not take your sex tips on how to please a man you do not think my body will ever be worthy of.”

Whoa line: “I have been taught to grow in.”

Whoa line: “…women who will prowl 30 stores in six malls to find the right cocktail dress, but haven’t a clue where to find fulfillment or how to wear joy”

Whoa line: “When they call you full of yourself”, say, “Yes.” 

Whoa line: ”…Van Gogh’s irregularities outweigh clean lines and clarity…”

Whoa line: “…Where are the words for the rest of me?”

Whoa line: “…It’s terrifying to have had to learn first not who I was but how I was seen…”