June 19, 2018

Hi, I’m Rachel (that’s me over on the right).

If you’re new here, let me introduce myself and this podcast.

I’m a life coach and teacher who helps women gain a deeper trust in their hungers — both at and away from the table.  In college, like many women, I had an eating disorder and through my recovery, I discovered the Health at Every Size movement, fat activism, and Intuitive Eating. These learnings lead me to see and believe that humans do not need to fit a certain size or shape, that our size is not a determinant of our well-being, that our well-being is not only about our physical self, that entire systems and industries exist to profit from making us spend our lives obsessing over food and our bodies, and most importantly, that we can actually trust our bodies to figure out what to weigh and what to eat.

In late 2017 my husband and I learned that we were expecting our first child and I found myself with a new question: why are the only times we celebrate a female belly when it belongs to a chubby baby, an adult with six-pack abs, or a thinner-bodied pregnant woman?

Even before my belly began to expand I was aware that I was likely to face two common rites of passages in our culture: the adoration of my pregnant belly and the shaming of my postpartum belly. Something about this simply didn’t make sense and it made me think about the broad range of experiences women have with their bellies throughout their lives in a body—and belly—toxic world.

So I set out to have a series of conversations with wise women about their bellies and how we all might find greater ease at the center of it all. These conversations make up The Belly Love podcast.

This is a capsule podcast—just 10 episodes start to finish—because I’m headed to maternity leave soon and I don’t know which projects will feel right to me on the other side of maternal initiation. In no way could these episodes capture every belly perspective or topic but I have tried to include a broad range. Hopefully, you will find something interesting and that helps you on your journey.

In addition to the podcast, I’ve created a powerful Belly Love guided meditation and digital workbook to support listeners in going deeper and exploring their own personal belly journeys. Both are available at the bottom of this post. Check them out!


Note: You can download or stream all the episodes below, or you can listen to them via iTunes or Stitcher.

Episode 1: Belly Activism and the War on Stomachs with fat activist Marilyn Wann

In this episode legendary fat activist Marilyn Wann joins me to talk about:

  • Fat (belly) activism
  • Taking down weight hierarchies
  • The problems with stomach amputation (a.k.a. gastric bypass surgery)

Marilyn Wann’s website

Fat?So!

Episode 2: Episode 2: My Belly Journey and How I’m Preparing for Postpartum Body Changes with Rachel Cole

In this episode, I, your host, share:

  • My first memory of belly shame
  • How I moved from belly shame to greater belly acceptance
  • The way I approach all body changes and how I’m preparing for the unknown of my postpartum belly

Episode 3: Belly Acceptance and Joyful Movement with Melissa Toler

In this episode speaker, writer, and educator Melissa Toler and I talk about:

  • Reclaiming movement and fitness from diet culture
  • What the flat stomach ideal represents
  • Redefining health beyond weight or muscle tone
  • The non-linear path of body (and belly) acceptance and giving up dieting

Melissa Toler’s website

Episode 4: When Fat Bellies Get Mistaken for Pregnant Bellies with Hilary Kinavey

In this episode licensed professional counselor and co-founder of Be Nourished Hilary Kinavey joins me to talk about:

  • How bellies are pathologized
  • Connecting (or not) to our belly through our family lineage
  • Being with the unknown of how your body will change
  • What to do when someone mistakes your fat belly for a pregnant belly
  • How small-bellied allies can support bigger-bellied humans

Be Nourished’s website

Hilary’s article “On Being Asked If You Are Pregnant

Episode 5: Living with (and Dressing) a Fat Belly in a Belly Judging World with Jes Baker

In this episode body liberation author and speaker Jes Baker joins me to talk about:

  • Making bellies visible in plus-size fashion
  • Dressing with a Visible Belly Outline (VBO)
  • Dealing with body judgment from other people
  • The difference between body positivity and body liberation
  • The inherent vulnerability of our bellies

Jes Baker’s Website

Jes’s Books:

Landwhale: On Turning Insults Into Nicknames, Why Body Image Is Hard, and How Diets Can Kiss My Ass

Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls: A Handbook for Unapologetic Living 

Episode 6: Belly Dancing, Embodiment, and Menopause with Bronwyn Simons

In this episode artist, astrologer, writer, belly dancer and co-founder of the Vivid Menopause Program Bronwyn Simons joins me to talk about:

  • Belly embodiment and living from the inside out (rather than the outside in)
  • The healing power of belly dancing and other movement practices
  • Redefining what it means to feel sexy and sensual in our body
  • Practical tips for navigating belly and body changes in menopause

Bronwyn Simons’s Website

Episode 7: Diastasis Recti and Belly Acceptance with Ariana Pritchett

In this episode strategist and mom Ariana joins me to talk about:

  • What diastasis recti is
  • How to navigate recovery from diastasis recti — especially when the medical community fails you
  • The importance of talking about pregnancy and birth-related body trauma

Follow Ariana on Instagram

Flight Design Co.’s Website

Episode 8: Menopause and Belly Fat with Dr. Margo Maine

In this episode, clinical psychologist and eating disorder specialist Dr. Margo Maine joins me to talk about:

  • How our culture’s toxic focus on women’s bellies is really about disempowerment
  • Why women’s belly fat actually isn’t “the worst kind of fat”
  • The health-supporting reasons behind gaining belly fat in menopause

Margo Maine’s Website

Margo’s Books:

Body Wars: Making Peace with Women’s Bodies

The Body Myth: Adult Women and the Pressure to be Perfect

Pursuing Perfection: Eating Disorders, Body Myths, and Women at Midlife and Beyond

Episode 9: Postpartum Belly Changes and Eating Disorder Recovery with Carla Korn

In this episode, psychotherapist and eating disorder specialist Carla Korn joins me to talk about:

  • Going through pregnancy and postpartum when you’ve recovered from an eating disorder
  • Postpartum belly changes and shame
  • The non-linear path of body acceptance
  • Practical tips for working with critical body thoughts

Carla Korn’s Website

Episode 10: Making Belly Peace and Embodying the Divine with Ivy Felicia

In this episodeThe Body Relationship Coach ™ Ivy Felicia joins me to talk about

  • Making peace with your belly (even if you don’t love it)
  • The myth that black women don’t struggle with poor body image
  • How a connection to the divine can help on the journey to body acceptance
  • How to navigate anger and body-blame when you have a chronic illness

Ivy Felicia’s Website


What’s next on your belly journey?

After listening to even one of the Belly Love podcast episodes, I imagine you might be swirling with questions and thoughts about your relationship with your own belly. So as not to leave you hanging I have prepared these two excellent next steps to support you in digging a bit deeper: a digital workbook and a guided meditation. In tandem, these resources give you a safe container to explore your past, present, and future belly experience.

Inside the workbook, you’ll find:

  • Advice from experts on topics such as how to move towards belly acceptance, how to grieve the belly you used to have or never had; what’s worked for them in making peace with their bellies; how to move past sticky old belly stories, and more.
  • LOTS of powerful writing and multimedia exercises to facilitate your belly exploration, healing, and active learning.
  • A robust resource list of belly loving articles to read and experts to follow

The guided meditation is 15-minutes long and provides a safe container to drop into your real lived experience of your belly with presence and curiosity. The meditation is designed for ongoing practice, allowing you to track your dynamic relationship to your belly.

The Belly Love podcast episodes are free and the workbook and meditation bundle are available to purchase for $25.

Real talk: the United States is the only developed country with no nationwide paid maternity leave. As a self-employed woman, I’m lucky that I can take leave to bond with my child without losing my job, but that brings with it a significant loss of income. This workbook and meditation bundle are one of the ways I am funding my leave. I believe you’ll find great value in these resources and your support is greatly appreciated.

 

September 14, 2017

I spent all of August (and some of this month) in bed.

Why?

Some combination of burn out from months of heightened devotion to my business, intense withdrawal from Zoloft (tapering in advance of trying to get pregnant), physical ailments (a persistent rash on my face, debilitating periods, and a polyp in my uterus), and yes, a daily diet of heart-shattering news of a world in the midst of destruction and eventual rebirth.

It would be easy to simply call it depression, but I’ve been depressed before and this was different.

Then I read something that named it perfectly: soul fever.

The thought of bringing a child into this world is heavy, and I’m exploring that from a lot of angles. Last week I picked up the book Simplicity Parenting and couldn’t put it down. It’s a powerful and useful read regardless of whether or not you have children. The value of the book, though not intended by the author, is in the roadmap it provides for parenting not just children but our adult selves in today’s overwhelming world.

Soul fever (just one of the book’s insightful concepts) is an inflammation, overheating, and overstimulation of the self. Soul fevers might not register on a thermometer, but you know when something is chronically not right. You know when ‘too much’ has driven you to your most unsupportive habits, dimmed your light, intensified your emotions, and thrown you off-kilter. Recent news of hurricanes, floods, fires, and earthquakes (never mind the raging inferno of white supremacy and toxic masculinity) is enough to make anyone sick on every level.

For most of human history, we didn’t have television or the news. Reports of what was happening around the world took time to travel. There was no 24/7 play-by-play of natural disasters or moment-to-moment death counts. We’re not designed to handle this much human suffering in real time.

I keep thinking about the documentary film Paper Clips that details one school’s effort to help children comprehend the human loss from the Holocaust. Knowing that it’s nearly impossible for anyone, not just children, to grasp how many six million lost lives is they set out to gather six million paper clips. This was an ingenious solution to working with the limitations of the human mind, and these days I feel my limitations acutely.

Perhaps you do too.

Perhaps, like me, you’ve come down with a soul fever.

Soul fevers don’t come and go in a day, but like a body fever, linger until proper rest and care have been given. Soul fevers won’t be ignored, they get worse and get louder.

According to the book, soul fevers arise when chaos and unpredictability, a lack of grounding, and intense pressures to go faster, do/have/achieve more — all drive one to be unwell.  

Soul fevers manifest differently in each person. We know a soul fever when whatever is a person’s homeostasis is thrown off and the discord persists.

It’s safe to say the whole world right now has a sort of soul fever. An arrhythmia of earth and of humanity.

It took me weeks to get quiet enough to hear where my heart is beating out of rhythm.

And it’s challenging if you’re a helper, a committed citizen, an aspiring ally, an empath, a highly sensitive person (HSP), or a conscious human — to juggle the pull to do something, anything, to help the suffering and threatened people ‘out there’, while also tending to yourself. It’s a delicate balance for many. 

I saw this floating around the internet this week and it really stuck with me:

What if we right now we didn’t try to be heroes?

What if we focused more on long-term ‘chronic empathy’ and caregiving—starting with ourselves, our experience, our minds, and our bodies?

Healing soul fever looks different for each person.

For me, it looks like not watching the news (I love Rachel Maddow, but the nightly dosage was making me ill) or deep diving into news commentary. Yes, I like to know what’s going on and thankfully, that’s relatively unavoidable, but I don’t need to know more than that right now.

It looks like getting offline, closing screens, and focusing on simple activities: a jigsaw puzzle, an embroidery project, or a walk around the neighborhood (without a politically-focused podcast to keep me company).

It looks like regular therapy sessions and truth telling to my kinfolk.

It looks like laughter — intentional, radical, unapologetic laughter. It looks like patience and a slow, wide-eyed stance as I, like everyone, navigate these choppy waters. It looks like doing what has to get done and nothing more.

It looks like going out into nature — not just so she can restore me — but so that I can feel into my relationship with her; something she is clearly asking each of us to do.


I invite you to step into a plane of expansive permission and curiosity:

Does this soul fever I speak of sound familiar?

What, in your life, is making things worse? What’s inflaming the fever? (hint: pay close attention to screen-time, news, and social media.)

What would you do if you had a body fever? What’s the equivalent of that for your soul?

What can you trust?

Can you trust in your own essential goodness?

Can you trust in your capacity to awaken, evolve, and hold contradictions?

Can you trust the pace that feels best to you?

Can you trust that other people can take the reigns if you take a break?

Can you trust in mother nature’s wisdom?

Can you trust that out of destruction and collapse, eventually, comes a new birth?

As I look ahead to the rest of 2017, my focus is on creating stillness, grounding, and breathing space for myself and for you. I have no doubt that with these things in place an engaged citizenship will rise, but without them, soul fever, paralysis, and disconnection set in.

If you’re suffering from your own acute soul fever do whatever you need to heal. If you are needing a break, a full stop, or a time-out please know that the permission is there for the taking and no irreparable harm will come of it.

Go gently.
Play the long game.
Listen, listen, listen for what is needed now.

Even in the darkness our hungers light the way forward.


A few ways I might be able to support you in moving through your soul fever:

Coaching

I have a few spots that opened in my practice this month. Coaching is actually where I feel my most grounded and powerful these days. If you could benefit from a strong container of love, practical strategies, and guidance through these uncertain waters reach out.

Replenish

There is nowhere I would rather right now than secluded in a canyon in Tucson, Arizona, sitting around the fire pit at night, listening to the owls, seeing the stars, and filling my cup. If a getaway is just what you need, consider hopping a flight to the desert in October and joining in for a long weekend of deep self-tending.

Savor

November will be here before we know it and I’ll be bringing back my daily audio meditations with a handful of new guest contributors. There has never been a year we have needed this more. Stay tuned.

Sift

Recently I started an in-person writing group—IT’S AMAZING. The first run ends in mid-October and I’ll be opening up spaces for a few new folks beginning in November. If you’re in the Bay Area and interested, send me an email.

Image Credit: Evelyn De Morgan

August 15, 2017

Before a fully formed theory comes a hunch.

Before a hunch comes a question.

Before a question comes curiosity.

I’m curious and I’ve got a question:

What if the same lack of self-worth that contributes to white men being violent towards others, women turn into violence against themselves?

A few disclaimers:

  1. These issues are multifaceted and any question I pose won’t illuminate some grand, pure truth. This stuff is messy and heavy with history and trauma and real-world impacts.
  2. I’m not excusing the racial violence perpetrated by white supremacists by drawing connections to poor self-esteem. Even if there is a connection it doesn’t make it okay. Not in any way.
  3. I’m not saying that white women aren’t also outwardly violent. They are.
  4. I’m not saying white men aren’t also inwardly violent. They are.
  5. I fully acknowledge that the way I’m framing this is rooted in the gender binary. I welcome your constructive critique and reframing.

What I want to get at is the thread of violence and othering. What I want to feel into is the ways in which what we are seeing out there that shocks us—in Charlotte, at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, at the Dar Al Farooq mosque in Minnesota— also lives inside each of us. Not just in our implicit biases, unclaimed racism, or our white privilege, which it certainly does, but in how we are in relationship to ourselves.

When we aren’t connected to our innate enoughness and our place in the family of humans our pursuit of enoughness and belonging too often turns violent.

For some white men, this violence turns outward.

For too many women the violence turns inward, toward the self.

Through perfectionism, loathing of the body, suppression of hungers, silencing of voice, denial of pleasure, dismissal of intuition, resistance to rest, and constant comparison to others, we are violent to ourselves. 

Yes, all of these behaviors are conditioned, encouraged and rewarded in a patriarchal society attempting to subdue the power of the feminine. After all, when a population of women is distracted and busy fighting a war against themselves they don’t have near as much fuel to resist and oppose real threats. AND our spiritual illusions foster us being complicit in this system.

This is the toxicity of the illusion of separateness. This is the danger in being asleep at the wheel of human living. Women must commit to stopping the inner violence and turn their peacemaking efforts not only outward but towards themselves. Women must take the anger and hatred that fuels self-criticism and redirect it to its rightful places. 

So I ask us to explore these questions:

How are you violent towards yourself and what are the real-world implications of that?

What are the tools of violence you use towards yourself and do you know why you do it? Is it your tone? Your voice? Your words? Is it withholding permission? Is it physical torture? 

When do you punish yourself?

When are you at war with yourself?

Where do you imprison yourself?

Where do you diminish yourself?

When do you starve yourself?

How do you beat yourself up and over what?

What within you do you denigrate?

What part of you do you guard yourself against?

Do you have such Stockholm Syndrome that self-inflicted violence feels comforting and safe? Do peace, softness, compassion, and kindness feel dangerous sometimes?

Are the ways that you’re violent towards yourself subtle? Are they easy to explain away? On the surface, do they appear benign and yet have impacts that tell of their harshness?

I realize I come to you with many questions and no answers. I’m not sure though that you benefit as much from my certain knowledge as you do from my directing you back to yourself as I go inward too.

What are your questions? What are you wondering? Where is your curiosity taking you and more importantly what actions are growing out of your questions?

As we see such horrific, intolerable incidents of violence I hope it inspires many things in us. I hope we are are raising our voices in whatever ways we can. I hope we’re talking to family members. I hope we’re physically showing up at vigils, rallies, protests, marches, the voting booth, and the offices of our representatives. I hope we are signal boosting non-white voices. I hope, if you’re white too, you’re doing the work to see all the ways you benefit from white privilege. I hope beyond anything that we are putting financial resources behind people and organizations that are on the frontlines of change.

In addition to these important responses, I’m adding that I hope we examine the places we have turned violence inward.


Posts:

Dieting is a Violent Act

Me, Myself, & I

The Protagonist

Women Behaving Badly

You’re Not Needly, You’re Starving

We.

Self-Compassion is a Verb

July 17, 2017

Over the past two weekends, I’ve gathered with some followers to share a bit more about some of my favorite topics. Here are the replays and some useful resources mentioned in each conversation. You can find future live sessions by following me on my Facebook page.

Self-Compassion & Sensitivity (7.8.17)


Self-Compassion Journal Prompts (we didn’t do all of these Live):

Describe your inner critic. What tone does it use? Does it sound like someone you know or knew in real life? What are it’s most common phrases or statement? What is it afraid of? What circumstances are most likely to incite your inner critic?

Describe your inner kind voice. What tone does it have? What are it’s most common phrases and statements? What circumstances invoke your inner kind voice and calm your inner critic?

Who if anyone serves as a role model to you for speaking to yourself with self-compassion?

Draw a circle. At the center of the circle draw a heart or a flame. On the inside of the circle jot down all the parts of yourself that you welcome, celebrate, accept, show to others and yourself.

On the outside jot down the parts you feel shame about, the parts you have not accepted, the parts you feel are inferior to other people.

What would it take for me to welcome in one of the pieces of me that I’m keeping in the cold into my heart? What would it take for me to accept that this part of me does not impede love? What part of my imperfect humanity could I welcome in just a bit more? What does that as yet unwelcome part of me need to hear me say?

Sensitivity Journal Prompts:

What were you told throughout your life about your sensitivity? Who told you that?

How have you been viewing your temperament? What shift would make it easier to be in your own skin?

What are you sensitive to? (music, noise, people, light, smells, clutter, traffic, roller coasters, temperature, touch, other’s emotions)

What’s an instance where your sensitivity has been an asset? What’s been the gift of your temperament?

Related Links: 

Feast: A 3 Month Journey to Becoming a Well-fed Woman

Kristin Neff

Elaine Aron


Intuitive Eating (7.15.17)

Related Links:

Sign up for the newsletter

Feast: A 3 Month Journey to Becoming a Well-fed Woman

26 things to do before you go on a diet

Am I Hungry App

Ellyn Satter Institute

Books:

Intuitive Eating

Intuitive Eating Workbook

Body of Truth

Health at Every Size

Body Respect

July 12, 2017

Over the last few weeks I’ve had a handful of dinner dates with girlfriends and to my surprise three of them, all on separate meetups, revealed to me that they were dieting.

That might seem normal in our current culture but I somehow believed that my friends knew better and that my teachings had been transmitted to them, directly or indirectly, over the many years we’ve known each other.

As I lay awake a few nights ago I began to ask myself:

Is it that my friends don’t understand what I do? Or better said, in my most indignant huffy voice: “After all these years don’t they agree with and trust my authority on this topic!?”

Is it that my friends are human and just susceptible to the overwhelming amount of weight-loss propaganda we all face?

Is it that in the face of weight gain they just don’t know what else to do? Is it that dieting has become such a knee-jerk response to too-tight pants that we don’t question it, even if our wiser self knows better?

Is it that our world feels like it’s spinning out of control and being on a diet feels safe and secure?

Likely, it’s some combination of all of these factors and more.

But I want to say to them and to anyone who wakes up and feels the siren call of dieting:

Hang on a minute! 

Wait! Before you commit to that diet or start researching Whole30 or reactivating your Weight Watchers account take a breath.

First, because it can’t be said enough: diets don’t work in the long-run and most often ultimately result in weight gain.

“But I’m not doing a diet!” you might say, “I’m just eating clean” or “I’m just watching my portions” or “I’m just giving up sugar.”

If you can mess it up it’s a diet.

If you’re making food choices predominantly with your brain rather than your body, it’s a diet.

If you have to follow rules to get it right, it’s a diet.

If you can google your specific new approach to eating and find a printable meal plan, it’s likely a diet.

When I say diets don’t work I mean they don’t result in long-term weight-loss, but they do have an impact.

Diets are a violence we perpetrate on ourselves no matter the seemingly benign or holy justification we offer up.

They leave us more disconnected from our hunger and fullness cues. They wreck havoc on our bodies. They treat grown adults like children. I could go on. Diets are bad news and best avoided. Oh, and if you’ve been on the diet train for a day or a lifetime, it’s never too late to get off.

Of course, your body is yours. It’s not my place to tell you how to feel about your body or what do with your body. This is an essential truth. And there are other ways than dieting to respond to your body’s increase in size (real or imagined) than restriction, especially when we know it doesn’t work.

A few other key things to remember before I offer up some suggestions:

Weight fluctuation is normal.

Bodies naturally come in a whole range of sizes.

The size of a body says nothing about the person, including how healthy they are.

Many, many people don’t have any accurate sense of their body because of some level of dysmorphia.

Our world is pretty sick and twisted when it comes to how we view and treat body fat and fat people.

Part of how we heal this on a global scale is by individual person after individual person opting out of thin supremacy, dieting culture, and weight stigma.

Many times the urge to diet is more about anxiety management than body size.

If you’ve gained weight recently or just unhappy with your size and you’re open, or even eager to doing something other than diet, here are just a few constructive responses:

  1. Work with an Intuitive Eating, Health-At-Every-Size-oriented coach or nutritionist. If you’d like a referral for your specific needs, shoot me an email.
  2. Read Intuitive Eating and work through the new workbook.
  3. Add some body-positive voices to your social media feeds.
  4. Delete body-negativity from your social media feeds. Unsubscribe. Unfollow. Be ruthless. 
  5. Throw out, give away, or put in storage any clothing that doesn’t fit the body you have right now.
  6. Ditch the scale too.
  7. Buy a few pieces of clothing that you feel great in, including underwear and bras.
  8. Go have fun. Do something, in this body, that makes you feel alive.
  9. Explore size-friendly yoga. Like with Anna, Jessamyn, Dianne, or Dana.
  10. Spend some time in nature. Notice how the trees never care about what you or they look like.
  11. Masturbate.
  12. Flirt.
  13. Cook or buy something that’s a 10 out of 10 on the delicious scale. Eat it with gusto. See if you can notice the moment your body says “Thank you, I’m done for now.”
  14. Download this hunger scale app. Play around. 
  15. Do nothing. Sit still. Hang out with the discomfort. Get curious.
  16. Let your body write you a letter. Write one back.
  17. Ponder body dysmorphia. Are you 100% sure that what you’re seeing is accurate?
  18. Go look at diverse images of the human body and behold the beauty in everyone.
  19. Ponder thin supremacy and how it might be related to your urge to diet.
  20. Ponder patriarchy and how it might be related to your urge to diet.
  21. Ask: if I never lost an ounce again, could I embrace myself and live my life fully?
  22. Ask: What does dieting distract me from?
  23. Join Feast.
  24. Reflect on past attempts at weight loss. Notice that they never ‘worked’.
  25. Ask: What in my life might be causing me to feel anxious or out of control?
  26. Listen to as many episodes of Food Psych as you can.

Dieting might feel like the logical response to feeling out of sorts in your body, or when your jeans don’t fit, or when eating feels out of control, but it’s a dead-end in the long run. The good news is that there is help and there are other ways that result in feeling better in your skin, more at peace with food, and more available to live your meaningful and full life.


A final note: this stuff is messy and multifaceted. Don’t believe anyone who tells you it’s simple or 1-2-3. What I’ve written here is just a first pass and not a one-size-fits-all directive. It’s complicated to have a body. It’s complicated to be a woman (cis or otherwise). It’s complicated when the world you live in tells you that because of your body or what your body might become you’re not worthy. It’s complicated, or it can be, to come back to your body when so many forces have driven you from it. I have so much care for all this complexity and the real and diverse human experiences that make up the body liberation/positive movement.

Hi, I'm Rachel

I am a life coach and fierce advocate for women feeding their truest hungers. I'm also a curator of inspiration and this is where I share the wisdom I've gained, words that trigger deep reflection, and resources to help you live your most well-fed life. Feast onward.

Returning February 2018

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