July 7, 2017

For many many years I’ve been fortunate enough to practice something called Wild Writing with Laurie Wagner. Each Friday morning when we’re in session I pack up my notebook and drive across the Bay Bridge to Alameda where myself and a handful of other women gather around her dining room table and spend two hours in practice.

I wish every woman in every community had a regular Wild Writing group. It feeds such a potent mix of hungers. The hunger for connection, for truth, for hearing your own voice, for laughter, for space and slowing down, for time away from screens, for emotional release, for inspiration and new discovery. For me, it’s often been a powerful support to my mental health. I could go on.

For some time now I’ve felt the call to lead my own group in my own version of this practice and so I am.

I’m calling it Sift: a writing practice for being human. 

Let me tell you a little bit about what this practice looks like and who I’m inviting to join me.

First off, this is, right now, just for women in the San Francisco Bay Area. We’ll be meeting in-person at my home.

I have space for 8 women in total. [NOTE: ALL SPACES HAVE BEEN RESERVED, EMAIL TO GET ON THE WAITING LIST FOR THIS AND FUTURE GROUPS]

We’ll meet Wednesdays September 6th – October 11th (side note: the last week we’ll actually meet on a Tuesday, October 10th) from 10 AM to noon. Yes, for now, this is for folks with flexible weekday schedules.

This is a practice. Like yoga or painting, it’s about showing up and being willing meet yourself where you are.

This is not for people who want to be better writers (though you can want that too), it’s not for professional writers (though you can be that too), it’s not really about the writing at all. It’s about what this practice helps us access and about doing it together. You need no prior experience to participate. Just a willingness to show up and be honest.

Personally, I practice to tell the truth, to be human with other humans, to hear my stories, to make sense of myself and the world around me, to make space for my contradictions, to find the words, to reveal, to relax, and to be a little messy.

The practice essentially goes like this:

You’ll arrive. Get a cup of tea. Settle in.

I’ll read a poem and when I’m done I’ll pick a line or two for us to use as our writing prompt.

Then we’ll write, unedited, pen to paper, not stopping for 10 to 20 minutes. We don’t try to sound smart. We don’t try to write well. This practice serves to help us get around our perfectionist and performer.

When the time is up we go around the table (myself included) and read our writing. No feedback is given. We don’t discuss what’s written. We just witness each other. Sometimes there is laughter. Sometimes there are tears. It’s all welcome.

Then we repeat.

If it sounds simple, it is. It’s also profound.
If it sounds exhilarating but also scary. You’re not alone.

The cost to participate for the six weeks during this initial run is $200.

If you want to reserve your spot at the table send me an email expressing your interest and I’ll send you an invoice for your deposit.  [NOTE: ALL SPACES HAVE BEEN RESERVED, EMAIL TO GET ON THE WAITING LIST]

If you don’t live in the Bay Area, Laurie, my brilliant teacher, teaches Wild Writing online in small groups and it’s very powerful in that format too.

May 12, 2017

Last week I met with a new client who struggles with perfectionism and she mentioned that she had recently decided to watch a movie late on a “school night”, even though she “knew better” and when she found herself tired at work the next day her logical conclusion was “I’m bad.” I’m bad as in, “I’m irresponsible, I’m not trustworthy, I make bad decisions” etc.

Hearing the order of events (watch a movie late → feel tired next day at work → conclude badness) it felt like she took a huge stratospheric leap between step A and C. And yet, this is a leap I hear women make all the time. Every week they lay their sins at my feet as evidence of their personal failings.

Here are just a few of the things that women I’ve worked with have told me is evidence of their personal, innate ‘badness’:

  • I ate the second box of cookies even though I knew I wasn’t hungry
  • I lashed out at my partner who was just trying to help me.
  • I missed an important deadline at work.
  • I’m fat.
  • Unbeknownst to me, I used an offensive term that hurt someone.
  • I talked down to a friend of mine.
  • My kid hit another kid at school.
  • I bought a new pair of shoes when I don’t really have the money for them.
  • I went on a date with someone I really liked but then they didn’t want to go on a second date with me.
  • I’m (insert age) years old and I still haven’t (insert life achievement) yet.
  • I don’t know how to ask for what I want in bed.
  • I didn’t speak up at my annual review and ask for the raise I know I deserve.
  • I was sexually assaulted and didn’t report it.
  • I just quit a well-paying job and don’t know what’s next for me.
  • I don’t want kids.
  • I didn’t vote in the last election.
  • I haven’t saved for retirement.
  • I’m, according to my doctor, ‘obese’
  • I just had to buy a bigger pants size.
  • I tried to do Whole30/Weight Watchers/Paleo and fell off the wagon.
  • I laid on the couch all weekend watching reruns of Seinfeld.
  • I have a partner who earns enough that I don’t have to work and so I don’t work.
  • I had work to do but I took a nap instead.
  • I slept with the guy on the first date even though I didn’t really want to.
  • I have a to-list a mile long and instead of doing anything productive I went to the movies
  • My house is filthy

And so it goes. On and on.

As you can see it’s pretty easy, by these measures, to be ‘bad’

So what’s wrong with labeling ourselves as bad?

It’s a dead-end.

It asks of us no curiosity or compassion. It leaves no room for nuance or humanity.

And importantly it doesn’t engender a different outcome, should you want that, next time.

There is nothing that inspires me less to make changes than feeling bad about myself. I have never and will never change my behavior in a lasting and wholesome way as a result of feeling like I’m not enough or because I berated myself.

Nevermind that it’s not true. “I am bad” is not an accurate description what’s going on and why we act the way we do.

So if we’re not bad then what are we? What’s the alternative?

We are human and the alternative is to look at ourselves through the lenses of compassion and curiosity.

When self-compassion has seeped into our bones and we’ve found ourselves nestled firmly amongst the family of bumbling humans something extraordinary happens: “because I’m bad” either ceases to be an option for explaining anything or it scarcely makes an appearance. (I’ll get into what replaces it down below.)

If “I’m bad” or some variation of it still show up on your list of possible explanations for your behavior, choices, life, experiences, or appearance then today I’m inviting you to, at least temporarily, in the name of experimentation, remove it. (Seriously, what if you couldn’t explain anything with that?!)

If you ask me what my work is about I will mention “hungers” and “women” and “feasting on your life”, but at the root, my work is really about how we relate to ourselves. When we are in an allied relationship with ourselves we trust our hungers and seek to feed them. When we are in an oppositional relationship to ourselves we mistrust our hungers and seek to numb, deny or minimize them.

This most essential relationship, the one we have with ourselves, also determines the lens through which we view all of our actions. If we’re not on the same team as ourselves, if on the inside we’re both the ‘good guy judge’ and the ‘flawed bad guy’ then “I’m bad” is a common conclusion to make.

When we’ve come to see that all parts of ourselves are welcome, that all parts of make sense, that there is no bad guy, and that we’re no better or worse (though equally special) than all humans we no longer find “I’m bad” on the list of ways to explain our actions.

So what happens when “I’m bad” isn’t an option?

What you find is a whole host of doors open up. You find immense compassion not just for yourself but for every human who is also wading through the muck of life.

It’s important to note that this isn’t a get out of jail free card. This isn’t how we justify behaving badly. This is how we see nuance. This is how we get to the root of what’s going on and what it means to be human. This is how we gain deeper insight into our own patterns and increase our sense of choice.

So, you might be wondering: “If I’m not bad then what’s going on?”

The most common answer, in my experience, is nothing.

Nothing is going on because the action is something any normal, imperfect human might do. Try it on for size: “I did X because I’m human. The end.” In these cases the only thing that needs to change is us embracing our own humanness, seeing ourselves within the family of humans, and holding ourselves to more human standards.

This one most often comes up around productivity and rest. The need for more sleep.The never-ending to-do list. The dirty house and unfolded laundry. All of these are typical areas for women to label themselves as lacking, when in fact, they are just human. Regular human, not superhuman. Join the club.

Other ways you might explain or interpret your behavior that don’t assign core not-enoughness include:

  • Because…I’m hurting and I didn’t know a better way to cope with it. (humans hurt sometimes and we don’t always use or have a robust coping toolkit)
  • Because I’m scared. (humans get scared)
  • Because I was checked out. (humans do that sometimes)
  • Because I wasn’t informed/awake. (humans have blind spots)
  • Because I was/am struggling to balance two or more competing needs. (humans have a lot of layers and often our needs rub against each other)
  • Because I was caught in my own illusions. (being human = egoic illusions that need to be worked through)
  • Because I was chasing love/safety and part of me thought I could find it if I did X (humans need love and safety and will do a lot of stuff to get any semblance of it.)
  • Because I was trying to live up to an unrealistic, inhumane standard. (humans, especially women humans, are expected to live up to a lot of impossible stuff)
  • Because I goofed. (humans goof up)
  • Because I was triggered (humans get triggered)
  • Because I was tired (humans get tired)
  • Because I behaved badly. (humans do that sometimes)

I’m not saying that given a do-over you wouldn’t, sometimes, go back and do some things differently. I am saying that there needs to be room for you to be human and for your very human actions not to be interpreted as you being deficient, bad, lacking, or not enough in any way.

Who you are is not what you do. What you do is a result of being an imperfect human with the level of consciousness, connection and healing you have at a given moment.

This means I can reject your behavior and not be rejecting you.
This means you can behave ‘badly’ and not be ‘bad’

This shift in lenses also means, again, that we can have a better understanding of why we behaved in a certain way and then have more space, thanks to compassion, to either accept ourselves or make a different choice next time.

There is no part of you that’s the enemy, that can’t be trusted, or that’s out to get you. There are just parts of you to be understood better, listened to more deeply, possibly healed, and ultimately, and always, loved.

If you want to know where to find these unwelcomed parts of yourself, here are a few places to look:

  1. Where do you feel less than other people or commonly compare yourself only to find most often that you rank below others?
  2. If I asked you to tell me all the ways you’re not living up to where you should be, what would you say? Where would you say you fall short? (I hope it’s clear I would never seriously ask you this question)
  3. Straight up: in what areas are you a bad mother, wife, friend, daughter, employee, etc.? (again, not a question I would ask because I disagree with the premise, but a good one to spark your awareness)

Your answers to all three of these questions will shed light on places you might offer some more compassion towards, you might let go of superhuman expectations, find a loving motivation to make changes, or simply seek to understand before you condemn.

I highly recommend the following books if this is a topic that feels alive for you:

There is Nothing Wrong with You: Going Beyond Self-Hate by Cheri Huber
Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of the Buddha by Tara Brach

September 11, 2016

hspus

I was just a few months into dating my now fiancé and we were returning from a day trip.

I was tired.

He was all of the sudden excited. “Oh! I want to take you some place!” he exclaimed.

“I’m pretty tired” I replied, struggling to find my clear “No thank you. Take me home please.”

It’s called the Warehouse Cafe though it’s much more warehouse than cafe.

Walking into this dive bar, so dark that it took more than a minute for our eyes to adjust from the afternoon light, I immediately felt awash in sadness. Not my own sadness, but the sadness of the people there. Hunched over the bar, nursing a drink that was far from their first of the day. They were sad. Not even outwardly sad, but emanating sadness nonetheless, and I could feel it.

It washed over me like a cloud of cigarette smoke and made it just as hard to breathe.

Returning with drinks for us Justin beamed with that ‘Isn’t this place cool!’ look in his eyes.

“I need to get out of here” I responded as tears welled up in my eyes and my breath got short.

Wandering out back amidst a crowd of rowdy bikers we found a place to sit and I started to cry.

Needless to say he was perplexed.

Why had walking into a bar—a bar he was excited to take me to—made me cry?

I tried to explain.“The people in there.” Wiping away tears. “They are so sad. I can feel it.”

Now he was annoyed. I seemed crazy to him and his mind flashed forward to what life might be like with me, unable to ever set foot in a cool dive bar, too sensitive to have any fun. Or so he feared.

Underneath it all he was disappointed. I had popped his balloon.

Nothing I could say in the moment helped me make sense to him.

He was annoyed and I was outraged.

How could he not understand?! How could his first reaction to my upset not be compassion?!

No one spoke on the drive home and when he pulled up in front my apartment I got out, slammed the door, and he sped off.

We’d had our first big fight.


In the years since then I’ve come to understand several important things about myself, sensitivity, and relationships.

First, I am a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) and I was born this way.

Just like dogs can pick up on sounds and smells that humans cannot detect, HSPs can pick up on a whole range of stimuli that non-HSPs are often oblivious to. This makes us powerful. This temperament is a form of intelligence. We’re also the target of messages that we’re weak and too sensitive. Not so. Being an HSP is an asset despite the fact that our dominant culture doesn’t see it that way.

In my masterclass Feast we spend an entire week focusing on high sensitivity because it’s such an important cornerstone in the journey to make peace with food. Often a student will tell me they are an “emotional eater” but what they describe is an overstimulated highly sensitive person using food to calm their nervous system. The more my students understand what it means to be an HSP, shake off any shame of their sensitivities, and take care of their unique needs, the faster the choppy waters of eating stills.

The three aspects of self-care for HSPs are prevention, mitigation, and recovery. Prevention looks like making choices to avoid or modify situations in advance that are overwhelming to our nervous systems. Mitigation looks like being in the middle of an overstimulating situation and doing what you can to make it better. Recovery looks like preparing for and acknowledging that after an overstimulating event our nervous systems are asking us to actively participate in self-soothing.

As an HSP our role in relationship is that of educator. It is our task to teach others about our temperament, our needs, and importantly, about the myths and stigma surrounding sensitivity. It’s just fact that most people aren’t yet familiar with the term or definition of HSP. It’s on us to teach them both directly through words and indirectly by role-modeling how we treat our own sensitivities.

Four years after that tearful trip, Justin has a deep understanding of my sensitivities and a respect for the gifts they bring. Yes, he has moments of frustration but they are minimal and assuaged by all he knows now.

Recently Feast students asked about dating as an HSP, afraid that they would always be perceived as “too much” by any suitor. Rather than speak for him I asked Justin to share a little bit of his experience and this is what he had to say:

What would you tell a guy friend who said he was dating a someone who is an HSP? What advice would you give him?

Learn to be patient. It’s easy to overwhelm an HSP, and you need to slow down and most of the time, lower your voice.

Sometimes what triggers Rachel doesn’t make sense to me, and you just need to understand that it’s her own experience, and you just need to accept and respect it.

What would you tell a single female friend who was trying to navigate finding a partner as an HSP? She feels ashamed and afraid any partner would find her sensitivity a burden. What would you tell her?

Be yourself, and be honest with your partners. Either they get it, or they don’t. Don’t hide those feelings just to spare yourself embarrassment.

What’s been the best thing about dating an HSP?

Letting me tap into my own sensitivities, and knowing that you (Rachel) understand me and can empathize, no matter how odd or off-kilter my feelings might seem.

What’s been the hardest?

Missing out on going out to clubs, loud bars, dancing, drinking. Crowded places are hard, places that most of the time I wouldn’t have a hard time with.

What do you see me (Rachel) doing in terms of my own HSP tendencies that make dating me easier?

I see you try hard and put up with things you might not have been comfortable with before, like sometimes putting yourself in crowded/loud social situations you might have avoided in the past.

What do you do to make dating me (Rachel), an HSP, easier?

Accept the fact that you’re special and that I should treat you unlike any other woman I’ve been with before in my life.


Relationships don’t come built straight out of the box. They come as a pile of incomplete pieces that you, with your combined strengths and challenges, work to put together and when you need a missing part you have to work as a team to find it. As an HSP a few things make it easier to assemble a truly great partnership: 

  • Learn about your unique temperament
  • Exorcise any internalized shame you might have about being an HSP
  • Develop your own personalized ways of preventing, mitigating, and recovering from overstimulation
  • Respect your boundaries 
  • Assume the role of educator in relationships

Photo Credit: Rachelle Derouin

 

June 14, 2016

praise

In the early months of my anorexia the praise I received about my appearance and weight loss served as fuel for a dangerous fire.

“You look great!”

“What are you doing? You look awesome.”

“I wish I had your willpower.”

“Wow, you have a great body.”

Friends, strangers, and even my parents, in the early days, doled out praise for what appeared to be a newly discovered commitment to health and the smaller pants I could fit into.

Approval was like a drug. It felt good, really good, when it started and it served as a motivation later on. When I didn’t want to go to the gym or I wanted to eat something beyond my ultra restricted diet all I did was think about what people would say if I gained weight and that was enough to keep me in line.

In a lot of ways I was addicted to praise. The high I got from others celebrating my physical form (and how it conformed) was palpable. The panic I felt when (I projected that) others judged my body negatively was crushing.

My colleague Tara Mohr is brilliant when it comes to the topic of unhooking from praise andcriticism. Tara says that being hooked takes different forms, including:

  1. Dependence on, or addiction to praise –  causing us to do only those things that are likely to get us gold stars and others’ approval
  2. Avoidance of praise – not wanting to stand out from the crowd – even for positive reasons, which causes us to self-sabotage, to not do our best work
  3. Fear of criticism – which causes us to not innovate, share controversial ideas, pursue interests where we’ll be fumbling beginners or fail along the way, or do anything that makes us visible enough to be criticized!

She makes the astute suggestion to “always look at feedback as giving you information about the person or people giving the feedback, rather than information about yourself.”

Tara’s writings explores this topic mostly in the context of our careers and I want to take it further and apply it to praise and criticism of our bodies and food choices.

And unhooking in this realm is not an easy thing to do because we all want to belong. We all want approval. When we are praised it feels great. When we are judged or rejected it can feel devastating.

And yet, living at the mercy of the approval of others, striving to conform in our appearance or diets to what others or “society” deems good is the definition of disempowerment.

Being able to live our lives and make basic choices like what to eat, when to eat, and how much to eat without factoring in what other people will think is essential if we are to feel free and unmasked—if we are to stay connected to the immense wisdom of our bodies.

Feeding ourselves is one of the most basic acts of autonomy. No one else should have a say in what we put into our bodies and yet for too many women, with each bite, comes a cacophony of judgemental voices—some real, some projected.

This happens when we get dressed too. Our minds run off with thoughts of “Does this make me look fat?” “Does this show my belly/thighs/arms/butt, etc?” “Will so and so think I’ve gained weight?” “Will they think I’ve given up?” Too often we sit on the side lines, skip the party, or spend more than we can afford on clothing just to mitigate the judgement we fear others will have of how we look. 

But, as Tara so eloquently explains “the goal…is not to become impervious to praise and criticism. That would be impossible. It would also be inhuman, and would force us to deny an important part of ourselves….The part of us that wants others to receive us with appreciation, with enthusiasm – the part that wants to be loved by those around us? I think that’s a very tender, real, part of us, a part to honor too. The point is not to become disconnected from feedback, to have such a thick skin that we can’t feel it or hear it, but rather, to become “unhooked” by it, to not be run by it. The point is to be run by our own wisdom…The goal is to not have others’ ideas about us distract us, silence us, or take us on an emotional roller coaster.”

I agree. In the end it comes down to what we each, as individuals, decide is important in a meaningful life. Unhooking from praise and criticism when it comes to our bodies and our food choices is a life long practice. Each of us has an ego that is ready and willing to lure us back to that to the roller coaster. Getting hooked isn’t a failure.

So what does it look like when we’re unhooked from body praise and criticism?

It looks like this:

  • Eating what we want, not more or less based on what other people are eating or who we are eating with, or what social function we have coming up on our calendar.
  • Allowing photos of us to be taken and seen, knowing that a moment captured in 2-D doesn’t define us or tell our whole story.
  • Not hiding in the ways we dress or hiding what we are choosing to eat.
  • Letting someone else’s comments about our appearance be about them.
  • Dressing and adorning ourselves for ourselves, with pride, and the body we have today.
  • Observing the hurt or fear that comes from criticism and looking inward to where we may be holding self-judgement. After all, it’s much harder to be hurt by criticism we don’t agree with.
  • Doing our best to practice non-judgement when it comes to other people’s eating and appearance.
  • Sometimes consciously giving up the SHORT-TERM high we know we’d get if we went on a crash diet. We unhook when we choose long-term, internally-based sustainable happiness instead of short-term, external hits of power. This happens in small moments. 
  • When necessary, reminding other people that our body, appearance, and food choices are entirely our own domain—no outside contributions needed or welcome.

Unhooking is a practice, but remember, what I think of you, or she thinks of you, or he thinks of you, or your inner critic thinks of you doesn’t much matter. You are in charge. Your body is yours. Your reasons behind your food choices are personal and multifaceted and no one’s business.

Go to the party. Take the photograph. Put on whatever size clothing fits your body today and feels comfortable. Eat what you want, in public, in front of people who are still entranced by diet culture.

Have no shame for struggling, getting hooked, bumbling toward finding your way, or being a human who feels deeply—this stuff isn’t easy.

Ultimately though, when you can, remember that what other people think about your body and food choices only has as much power as you give it.


If you’re interested in learning more about Tara Mohr’s teachings on unhooking from praise and criticism check out her book Playing Big. It’s a game-changer.

April 11, 2016

badguy

You are not the bad guy in the story of your life.

If you read a novel and the main character made all the same, moment by moment, choices that you have, in the context of a life identical to yours, the result, I’m sure, would be compassion and empathy for that character—not judgement.

At every turn of your life from the day you were born you have first acted to keep yourself safe and soothed. This is primal. This makes sense. You make sense. 

We don’t always have access to resources within ourselves that might steer us toward less harmful actions. Sometimes our actions hurt ourselves or others. And still this doesn’t make us the bad guy.

If you are carrying around a thousand pound boulder of guilt and shame, of belief that you failed in some way or should have done better I implore you to put the boulder down. Forgive yourself!

You are not the bad guy in the story of your life.

You have always always always been trying to survive.

That might mean that for thirty years you came home from work and binged on food you didn’t taste or enjoy.

That might mean that for a while you lived beyond your means, regularly buying shoes and other empty impulse purchases

That might mean that you’ve acted poorly, childlike perhaps, toward a friend or family member. Lashed out. Been selfish. Held a grudge. 

No matter the scenario: you are still not the bad guy in the story of your life.

You are just the human—good, fallible, sacred—finding your way.

Forgive yourself. Please.

Your unnecessary self-judgement and shame only builds walls: between you and I, between you and your self, between you and life.

As you read back over the book of you, notice that it makes perfect sense why the protagonist made that choice and then, as they say, take heart that when you know better you will do better.

Related post: Doing your best.

Hi, I'm Rachel

I am a life coach and fierce advocate for women feeding their truest hungers. I'm also a curator of inspiration and this is where I share the wisdom I've gained, words that trigger deep reflection, and resources to help you live your most well-fed life. Feast onward.

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