March 10, 2018

 

For many many years, I’ve been fortunate enough to practice something called Wild Writing with Laurie Wagner. Each Friday morning when we’re in session I pack up my notebook and drive to Lauri’s house where myself and a cohort of other women gather around her dining room table and spend two hours in practice.

I wish every woman in every community had a regular Wild Writing group. It feeds such a potent mix of hungers. The hunger for connection, for truth, for hearing your own voice, for laughter, for space and slowing down, for time away from screens, for emotional release, for permission to be imperfect, for inspiration and new discovery. For me, it’s often been a powerful support to my mental health. I could go on and on.

For a long time I felt the call to lead my own group in my own version of this practice and so last year I finally did.

I called it Sift: a writing practice for being human. Though the subtitle should probably be “a practice for being human together through writing” but that’s a mouthful and well, semantics!

And for six weeks in 2017, myself and a table full of brave women met weekly and let this practice feed us. Then I did it again at the start of this year and for the past eight weeks hosting and participating in this practice has been one of the keys to my well-fed life.

And I’m doing it AGAIN…

I’m hosting another 8-session in-person group AND, for the first time, I’m offering this practice virtually.

Let’s start with an overview of what Sift is:

This is a practice. Like yoga or painting, it’s about showing up and being willing meet yourself where you are.

This is not for people who want to be better writers (though you can want that too), it’s not for professional writers (though you can be that too), it’s not really about the writing at all. It’s about what the practice helps us access and about doing it together. You need no prior experience to participate. Just a willingness to show up and be honest.

Personally, I practice to tell the truth, to be human with other humans, to hear my stories, to make sense of myself and the world around me, to make space for my contradictions, to find the words, to reveal, to relax, and to be a little messy.

The practice essentially goes like this:

You arrive. Settle in. We do a little warming up and then I read a poem and when I’m done I pick a line or two from the poem for us to use as our writing prompt.

Then we’ll write, unedited, pen to paper, not stopping for 10 to 20 minutes. We don’t try to sound smart. We don’t try to write well. This practice serves to help us get around our perfectionist and performer. This practice helps us tell the truth on the page so we can tell the truth in the rest of our lives.

When the time is up we go around the table (myself included) and read our writing. No feedback is given. We don’t discuss what’s written. We just witness each other. Sometimes there is laughter. Sometimes there are tears. Most of the time there are nodding heads. It’s all welcome. Then we repeat.

If it sounds simple, it is. It’s also profound.

If it sounds exhilarating but also scary. You’re not alone.

If it sounds fun and nourishing, it is!

If this calls to you, raise your hand.

What a few past participants had to say…

“Sitting at the table with a group of thoughtful women is my weekly retreat.  And I mean that in the most sacred, spacious, nurturing way. Rachel offers a gentle invitation and I get to set aside my to-do lists, relentless perfectionism and over functioning ways to be guided into JUST BEING with words and the wisdom that pours onto the page.  For two hours, I don’t need to control anything.  I don’t need to be clever.  I get to show up and be present to a circle of women who are present to me, too.  When the time comes to return to the lists and obligations, I do so with a profound sense of restoration and renewal.”

“I signed up for Sift not knowing what to expect but with the intent to challenge myself (and with a dash of inner-critic fear). Rachel’s outline of the program doesn’t do justice to the experience of being in it. It’s like a weekly meeting with myself, sometimes a time to release and be playful, sometimes a line into something deeper. I enjoy the process, which naturally facilities presence, and it’s been an honor to sit in communion with other women and to hear the stories they choose to share. Perhaps the best thing about Sift is it’s without expectation and judgment, truly. I can flow into and float out of our weekly sessions.”

“I love Sift for bringing together an amazing group of women. The structure is helpful for introverts like me (not a lot of small talks). This group has been incredibly helpful and supportive for helping me process some difficult life events as well as finding my voice. Rachel is offering a beautiful gift to the world!”

How to Participate

In-Person Sift

Where: My home in Oakland, California near the Oakland Zoo.

Time: 10 am-noon on Wednesdays

Dates: 3/38, 4/4, 4/11, 4/25, 5/2, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (Note: these are not all consecutive)

Cost: $300, nonrefundable.

Space: I have one space at the table remaining as of 3/14.

Deadline to apply: March 23rd. Filled on first-apply basis.

To join: Email me!


Virtual Sift

Where: We’ll meet via the free Zoom video conferencing platform.  

Time: 10 am-noon, Pacific time zone, on Mondays

Dates: 4/2, 4/9, 4/30, 5/7, 5/21, 5/28, 6/4, 6/11 (Note: these are not all consecutive)

Cost: $300, nonrefundable.

Space: I have space for six participants.

Deadline to apply: March 30th. Filled on first-apply basis.

To join: Email me!


FAQ

I’m not a writer. In fact, I’m a terrible writer, but I feel called to this practice. What should I do?

Let me reiterate that this is not a practice for people who identify as writers or ‘good’ writers, though they are welcome too. This is a practice that using writing to support us in being more at ease being human and for that, you need no skill or title.

I’m traveling for some of the dates listed, can I still join?

Participants must pay in full but life happens and it’s okay to miss a few sessions due to scheduling conflicts.

I have a question you didn’t answer on this page.

Please email me!

July 17, 2017

Over the past two weekends, I’ve gathered with some followers to share a bit more about some of my favorite topics. Here are the replays and some useful resources mentioned in each conversation. You can find future live sessions by following me on my Facebook page.

Self-Compassion & Sensitivity (7.8.17)


Self-Compassion Journal Prompts (we didn’t do all of these Live):

Describe your inner critic. What tone does it use? Does it sound like someone you know or knew in real life? What are it’s most common phrases or statement? What is it afraid of? What circumstances are most likely to incite your inner critic?

Describe your inner kind voice. What tone does it have? What are it’s most common phrases and statements? What circumstances invoke your inner kind voice and calm your inner critic?

Who if anyone serves as a role model to you for speaking to yourself with self-compassion?

Draw a circle. At the center of the circle draw a heart or a flame. On the inside of the circle jot down all the parts of yourself that you welcome, celebrate, accept, show to others and yourself.

On the outside jot down the parts you feel shame about, the parts you have not accepted, the parts you feel are inferior to other people.

What would it take for me to welcome in one of the pieces of me that I’m keeping in the cold into my heart? What would it take for me to accept that this part of me does not impede love? What part of my imperfect humanity could I welcome in just a bit more? What does that as yet unwelcome part of me need to hear me say?

Sensitivity Journal Prompts:

What were you told throughout your life about your sensitivity? Who told you that?

How have you been viewing your temperament? What shift would make it easier to be in your own skin?

What are you sensitive to? (music, noise, people, light, smells, clutter, traffic, roller coasters, temperature, touch, other’s emotions)

What’s an instance where your sensitivity has been an asset? What’s been the gift of your temperament?

Related Links: 

Feast: A 3 Month Journey to Becoming a Well-fed Woman

Kristin Neff

Elaine Aron


Intuitive Eating (7.15.17)

Related Links:

Sign up for the newsletter

Feast: A 3 Month Journey to Becoming a Well-fed Woman

26 things to do before you go on a diet

Am I Hungry App

Ellyn Satter Institute

Books:

Intuitive Eating

Intuitive Eating Workbook

Body of Truth

Health at Every Size

Body Respect

July 7, 2017

For many many years I’ve been fortunate enough to practice something called Wild Writing with Laurie Wagner. Each Friday morning when we’re in session I pack up my notebook and drive across the Bay Bridge to Alameda where myself and a handful of other women gather around her dining room table and spend two hours in practice.

I wish every woman in every community had a regular Wild Writing group. It feeds such a potent mix of hungers. The hunger for connection, for truth, for hearing your own voice, for laughter, for space and slowing down, for time away from screens, for emotional release, for inspiration and new discovery. For me, it’s often been a powerful support to my mental health. I could go on.

For some time now I’ve felt the call to lead my own group in my own version of this practice and so I am.

I’m calling it Sift: a writing practice for being human. 

Let me tell you a little bit about what this practice looks like and who I’m inviting to join me.

First off, this is, right now, just for women in the San Francisco Bay Area. We’ll be meeting in-person at my home.

I have space for 8 women in total. [NOTE: ALL SPACES HAVE BEEN RESERVED, EMAIL TO GET ON THE WAITING LIST FOR THIS AND FUTURE GROUPS]

We’ll meet Wednesdays September 6th – October 11th (side note: the last week we’ll actually meet on a Tuesday, October 10th) from 10 AM to noon. Yes, for now, this is for folks with flexible weekday schedules.

This is a practice. Like yoga or painting, it’s about showing up and being willing meet yourself where you are.

This is not for people who want to be better writers (though you can want that too), it’s not for professional writers (though you can be that too), it’s not really about the writing at all. It’s about what this practice helps us access and about doing it together. You need no prior experience to participate. Just a willingness to show up and be honest.

Personally, I practice to tell the truth, to be human with other humans, to hear my stories, to make sense of myself and the world around me, to make space for my contradictions, to find the words, to reveal, to relax, and to be a little messy.

The practice essentially goes like this:

You’ll arrive. Get a cup of tea. Settle in.

I’ll read a poem and when I’m done I’ll pick a line or two for us to use as our writing prompt.

Then we’ll write, unedited, pen to paper, not stopping for 10 to 20 minutes. We don’t try to sound smart. We don’t try to write well. This practice serves to help us get around our perfectionist and performer.

When the time is up we go around the table (myself included) and read our writing. No feedback is given. We don’t discuss what’s written. We just witness each other. Sometimes there is laughter. Sometimes there are tears. It’s all welcome.

Then we repeat.

If it sounds simple, it is. It’s also profound.
If it sounds exhilarating but also scary. You’re not alone.

The cost to participate for the six weeks during this initial run is $200.

If you want to reserve your spot at the table send me an email expressing your interest and I’ll send you an invoice for your deposit.  [NOTE: ALL SPACES HAVE BEEN RESERVED, EMAIL TO GET ON THE WAITING LIST]

If you don’t live in the Bay Area, Laurie, my brilliant teacher, teaches Wild Writing online in small groups and it’s very powerful in that format too.

April 13, 2016

YCH+2

We spend a huge percentage of our lives working and that time can either leave us feeling full or hungry.

I know both sides of that coin very well.

I have had the brain-numbing, the soul-sucking, and the toxic jobs. Lots of them.

But my work today is not painful or depleting. It’s rewarding and gentle.

This kind of work—the kind that has deep purpose and is sustainable—is what everyone deserves.

As a life coach I work with women on the full range of life hungers: food, intimacy, spirituality, creativity, and yes, meaningful work. The truth is, more often than not though, I send those with career hungers to Laura Simms. She’s my career coach guru. When my students are really ready to be vocationally well-fed it’s Laura I turn them on to.

Laura doesn’t offer one-on-one coaching, but instead, teaches through her gorgeous and impactful masterclass: Your Career Homecoming and her course begins again soon. This is a course I’ve sent countless students to and only heard rave reviews.

As a way to support you in your pursuit of more fulfilling work and to share more about this incredible program Laura and I are hosting a live Career Hungers Conversation and Q&A on Wednesday, April 20th at 7 pm CT/5 pm PT.

If your current career is out of alignment with who you are and who you want to be…

If you feel like your career is the missing piece to having the life you want…

If “What am I going to do?” has become a central obsession in your life…

If you are worn down by your mind-numbing, heart-draining job…

Then join Laura and me on Wednesday.

We’ll be discussing a whole range of topics, including:

  • How you can begin to hear your specific career hungers
  • What to do with internal voices that tell you “It makes no sense for you to switch careers!” or “It’s too late for you to change career paths!”
  • Why it’s important and how to take into account not just the work you want to do, but the kind of life you want to have.
  • and lots more, plus we’ll be taking any and all questions you have about your

Call Details

April 20th at 7 pm CT/5 pm PT (the call will last one hour)

(425) 440-5100, 701832#, or
http://iTeleseminar.com/83078130

If you want to be a part of the call but can’t make it or just want to get your questions in the queue, you can submit them in advance and you’ll be emailed a link to listen to the call recording.

BUTTON2


careerhungers.border

December 1, 2014

I want to share with you some thoughts I’ve been having lately about the waning paradigm of the hungry woman, about the difference between hungry women and Well-fed Woman, and about why I created Feast.

It’s not often I do a video blog, but try as I might to channel these thoughts through my keyboard this week I could not.

Before you watch, there are some unnecessary qualifiers I feel compelled to make:

Like the video might be a bit rambly, I’m not always sure I’m making sense, and I certainly didn’t remember to say everything I wanted to say. Perhaps it’s the vulnerability of it that makes video my rarely used medium. Regardless here’s a good bit of what wanted to be offered to you with a whole lot of heart.

Hi, I'm Rachel

I am a life coach and fierce advocate for women feeding their truest hungers. I'm also a curator of inspiration and this is where I share the wisdom I've gained, words that trigger deep reflection, and resources to help you live your most well-fed life. Feast onward.

Returning February 2018

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