What I've been chewing on lately...

March 22, 2017

Dear Sister,

I believe the most powerful force in the world is an embodied woman.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of forces working against women having deeply rooted, peaceful, and trustworthy relationships with their own flesh. These forces are cultural, governmental, sometimes parental, and always patriarchal.

I’m committed to helping change this and it’s easier than we might think. We don’t need to change those systems as much as we need to stop participating in them. We need to opt out. We need to see through the paradigm of body shaming, body loathing, body shrinking, body judging, body comparing, body manipulating, body commodification, and body warfare.

Why? Because there is nothing wrong with women’s bodies. The pursuit, or rather obsession, to fix, change, improve, conform, and hide the female body is draining invaluable resources: women’s mental, emotional, and physical energy.

We need that energy. We need those resources.

But before we can stop the leak, we need to know our story.

What is our personal body story? What is the story we tell ourselves about our body and intimacy? What is the story we replay about our body and its ability, or disability? What is the well-worn story we have about our body and food? We have to lay bare our body stories so we can see what parts no longer fit or feel true, and let them go.

It has taken years and years to heal and rewrite my own body story. There is no forcing what’s not ready to fade away. It took me so long, in part, because I was ashamed that as a smart, educated, capable, conventionally attractive, privileged feminist I struggled with my body. I had to look at my story; the one where people like me didn’t have a right to struggle too.

Your story is likely different than my story. Or maybe, in parts, it’s similar.

Regardless, your story matters. Your ability to author and revise your story matters.

I mentioned a few months back that I was developing a workbook is an invitation to explore the story you’ve been carrying about your body, to let go of the parts that don’t belong to you, and to move into a truthful, compassionate, and sovereign narrative. Well, today it’s here!

Your body is yours, despite all the forces conspiring from the day you were born to tell you otherwise. The Body Sovereignty Workbook will help transform the story you tell yourself about your body into a life-changing narrative. It includes 83 beautiful digital pages of essays by 10+ women’s empowerment experts, worksheets, and activities to support your cultivating an empowered relationship with your body. In addition to my own writings collected from the best of my archive, contributors include Carmen CoolJulie DaleyCaroline Dooner, Mara GlatzelSummer Innanen, Hilary Kinavey, Dana Sturtevant, Willo O’BrienAndrea Scher, Bari Tessler, and Pace Smith.

And here’s the best part: 100% of profits from The Body Sovereignty Workbook will be donated to Emily’s List and The National Center for Transgender Equality.

If you’re not familiar with these organizations. EMILY’s List is committed to driving progressive change throughout our country by winning elections that put pro-choice Democratic women into office. The National Center for Transgender Equality is the nation’s leading social justice advocacy organization winning life-saving change for transgender people.

When you purchase The Body Sovereignty Workbook you’ll get to select which of these two charities you’d like your funds to go towards. The base cost for the workbook is just $10 and you you have the option to make a larger donation if you’d like. Again, 100% of the profits go to these two organizations.

If you’re ready to explore your body story and to move towards greater body sovereignty I hope you’ll grab your copy of The Body Sovereignty Workbook todayI’d also be grateful if took a moment to share this post with your community so that we can generate as much support for these organization and as many sovereign women as possible.

 

Image credit: Nu debout de face (1910-11), Roger de La Fresnaye

posted in Uncategorized
February 4, 2017

I have a practice called Wild Writing. I learned it from the inimitable Laurie Wagner and I attend a Wild Writing group with her most Friday mornings. The group practice goes something like this:

1. Laurie reads a poem. A good poem. A grounded poem. Not an abstract, hard to deconstruct poem. A poem about dirty dishes in the sink or a poetic list of life regrets. Then she pulls one or two lines from that poem and offers it up as our prompt.

2. We use the prompt, or not if we don’t feel like it, and we write for fifteen minutes without stopping. The pen never stops. We write too fast for the inner critic or to sound smart. We just go. We try to find the vein of what really wants to be said. No performing. Just truth.

3. Then we go around the table and we share what we wrote. No one responds. We are just witnessed. Then the next person reads.

4. We repeats this two more times.

5. We go home cleansed.

Today was my first day back at the Wild Writing table in a long while. The holidays, a wedding, and political upheaval had pulled me away. I returned, as I often do, doubting whether I have anything to say or if I will even remember how to do this (despite it being so simple). Below are two of the pieces I wrote this morning. Unfiltered.

May they inspire you to get it out, write it out, speak it out. May they call forth the messy truth, the contradictions, and the part inside of you that knows what’s needed now.


Advice to Myself

Go the flea market. Spend $8 on clip-on earrings of mini bingo cards. Spend $3 on poster board for protest signs — have a wardrobe of signs at the ready.

Sew like your life depended on it. Sew like the world will come apart at the seams if you don’t stitch it up.

Measure the pillow insert and remeasure and remeasure and even though it says 19”, ignore it. Pretend it’s 20” in a world where facts are debatable. You can decide it’s 20” if you don’t mind a slightly oversized pillow case.

Pray to the light of cute babies and dinner parties where you pull animal spirit cards and share whose husbands have trouble getting naked and whose have trouble staying clothed. Pray to the light of French onion soup and a life free from wedding planning.

Pray to the light because you have no choice but to bury your fingers—no, your arms—in the blackest of dirst and dig. Dig like a chain gang. Each of us sentenced to hard labor for the foreseeable future. If you sit this out completely you’re a traitor.

Make granola. Toast the oats and the coconut and use the last bits of crystallized ginger, the sesame seeds, the sour cherries—the ones you bought in Germany for plane snacks but never ate.

Advice to myself: get on your fucking yoga mat. Your neck and shoulders and hips are a few of the most trustworthy sources of information there are right now.

Go out for thai food, slurp noodles in between glances of the basketball game.
Roll lettuce cups while too-calmly explaining that you’re just at the “impeachment” stage.

[This writing was inspired by Lousie Erdrich’s Advice to Myself poem]


What kind of times are these?

These are times of picking battles. These are times where so much that used to ruffle feathers falls insignificantly, weightlessly by the wayside.

It doesn’t matter that he needed one typewriter ribbon but ordered four to get the free shipping. Or that she’ll have to take a cab because you’re running late. Your weight doesn’t matter, it didn’t then and it really doesn’t now. It doesn’t matter that you have two turnips in your vegetable drawer that have been there since October.

Kellyanne Conway’s frizzy hair, the President’s tiny orange hands, or Mike Pence’s repressed homosexuality don’t matter.

No, we have to keep our eyes on the prize, eyes on the bloody Syrian baby, eyes on The Constitution, eyes on our community, eyes on what our dollars support, eyes on the times that we blindly checked the box for the incumbent or didn’t check the box at all.

What doesn’t matter is if the cleaning lady sees your vibrator or you forgot to eat a vegetable today, or this week. It doesn’t matter if you called your grandmother out of obligation or if you haven’t cancelled that unused gym membership yet.

No, what matters is the friend with seizures who may lose his health insurance. What matters is the sixteen year old who, like you, had sex with her boyfriend, and unlike you got pregnant. What matters is the life she wants to live. What matters is that, as painful as it is, we read the news every day. What matters is that nice white ladies put their bodies visibly out there in support of black bodies.

It doesn’t matter if people call you radical or you make a mistake. It doesn’t matter if the NSA taps your phone and hears you saying almost daily how comfortable you are with someone committing assassination.

No, this is a time of stark contrast and we must pick our battles. If we’re not fighting to protect what we hold dear, we don’t deserve it. We might not deserve it.

Is this boring? All this call to arms? Are we already jaded, already too overwhelmed, already too confused about what’s happening and who’s in charge and “How could he say that?” and “How could he not know that?!” Are we there yet?

What matters is that’s what they want: to exhaust, confuse, and lull us.

What kind of times are these?

[This writing was inspired by Adrienne Rich’s What Kind of Times Are These poem]


During extremely stressful times, our internal challenges can become magnified.

The current political crisis in America has lead everyone I know to react in a different way. Some are channeling their anxiety into activism. Others are burying their head in the sand — or the refrigerator. Some are circling their community for comfort — others are putting themselves on punishing exercise plans.

If you are struggling right now with your relationship to food and your body Feast will give you the tools you need to navigate this particularly uncertain moment in history: self-compassion, intuitive eating, effective emotional coping, and self-trust.

posted in Activism / fear
January 19, 2017

sovereignty

“What do you want to do for lunch?” I heard a woman say to her friend.

“Oh I’m skipping lunch today. I was a pig yesterday. Trying to make up for it,” the friend responded.


This conversation snippet could be heard anywhere. At the gym, a coffee shop, a bus stop, or perhaps even in your own home. But I heard it from two women I was standing next to at the last major women’s march.

In 2004 I, along with several of my college girlfriends, drove from Ohio to DC to attend the March for Women’s Lives. I can tell you that standing on The National Mall with nearly a million other humans making our voices heard on behalf of women’s rights was deeply moving. I can tell you that hearing this conversation then and there was deflating and yet, not all that surprising.

For all of the progress women have made too many are still ensnared in an oppressive paradigm wherein women’s bodies are viewed as untrustworthy, objects, dirty, “before” pictures, commodities, and available for the input of and control from others.

I call this part of patriarchy: body submission.

You likely know that I care a lot about women breaking free from dieting. I spend a lot of time teaching women to return to intuitive eating. I’m committed to body positivity and the liberation that all women deserve to feel from oppressive beauty standards.

But you know what’s beneath all that?

Body sovereignty.

Body sovereignty is the opposite of body submission.

I am utterly devoted to contributing to the emergence of a world where women that have body sovereignty grab hold of it — and where those who don’t yet have body sovereignty gain access to it.

Those of us who have it don’t give it up in broad daylight through obvious acts of self-abandonment.

No—small holes are poked in the bottom of our power bucket and it drips out slowly.

No—body submission is dressed up, marketed, and sold as body sovereignty. It’s a convincing fake-out.

No—some of our most beloved feminist icons, for all their wisdom, still peddle in body submission making body sovereignty something we often have to find without mainstream role models.

Body submission, the giving up of our physical sovereignty, is a sneaky thing.

Here are a few ways it manifests:
You’re getting a massage and want the bodyworker to change the amount of pressure they’re using but you stay silent so as not to be a “bother”.

You’re out to lunch and everyone you’re with decides not to order dessert. You want dessert but forego so as not to draw attention to the fact you’re eating more than others.

You go to the doctor and they ask you step on the scale. You don’t want to. You know that every time you step on the scale it’s triggering for you. You step on anyways so as not to be a “difficult” patient.

Your significant other wants sex. You really don’t. You have it anyways to be a “good” partner.
You want to become a yoga teacher, or run a marathon, or climb a mountain but someone told you that people that look like you or weigh what you way can’t do those things — so you don’t pursue them.
You need to be seated at the front of the lecture hall so you can hear but you don’t ask for this because that would be “special” treatment and you don’t want to ruffle feathers.

You go on a diet, the most ubiquitous and violent act of compliance there is, because you’ve been brainwashed to believe that you can’t trust yourself or your body. You’ve bought into one body submission’s main messages: you’re out of control.

Through small everyday acts of submission many women give up the power they have as the leader, decision-maker, advocate, and ally for their body.

What I want you to know is that your body is yours despite all the forces conspiring from the day you were born to teach, tell, and treat you otherwise.

Your body is yours.

Your body is good

Your body is sovereign.

What you wear, what you eat, when you sleep, and how and who you have sex with. This is all up to you.

The choices you make for your healthcare, whether to carry a pregnancy to term or not, whether to eat that cake or not, whether to stop eating, fucking, working out, or whatever right in the middle— it’s up to you.

Body sovereignty is the clear inhabitance of your choices and domain of flesh.

It is the the protection and respect of your boundaries and your body.

It is individuation. It’s where you begin and everyone else ends. You are an  adult. Grown, and thus free.

Body sovereignty is the advocacy of your needs, desires, and hungers. Especially in the face of disappointing others, ruffling feathers, and when your needs run contrary those around you.

Body sovereignty is the permission to choose, to err, to protect, to feel, to experience, to play, to refuse, to take up space, to be different, to be the same, to make noise, and to perform for no one.

It is to be beholden to no one but yourself.

Body sovereignty as I experience and know it is an allyship between oneself and one’s body in pursuit of self-supportive actions. What is self-supportive for one body may not be self-supportive for another body and only the inhabitant of the sovereign flesh can know what is right, and good, and true.

No one else can make you take advantage of your sovereignty and a lot of industries and social structures stand to profit and persist if you don’t.

My friend and colleague Desiree Adaway has a new daily practice in light of our current political landscape whereby she asks herself “Was I courageous, or complicit?”

This inspired me to ask: “Did I exercise my body sovereignty today, or did I submit?”

Those of us with the privilege to have our body sovereignty (or most of it) recognized by our culture, government, and society must advocate fiercely for this recognition to be given to all bodies.

“All bodies” means disabled bodies, bodies of people of color, aging bodies, bodies of the poor, bodies that love bodies of the same sex, transsexual bodies, trafficked bodies, sex worker bodies, and immigrant bodies.

Every time any of us reclaim our sovereignty we free not only ourselves but also the energy and attention needed to free others.

We must own, appreciate, protect and exercise our body sovereignty so that we can then use our bodies to bring this same sovereignty to everyone.

I ask you: What does this year look like for you if you were really inhabiting your sovereign body? What does body sovereignty look or feel like for you? Where are you not owning your sovereignty? How can you better respect and advocate for other people’s body sovereignty? 

I’ll be asking myself these questions Saturday at the Women’s March on Washington and for many days to come.


The other night after I’d turned off the lights and gone to sleep I woke up and quickly grabbed my phone (the modern pen and paper) to capture the following statement: Reclaiming sovereignty begins with rewriting the body’s story.

In light of these words I was inspired to create a workbook to help you explore and just maybe shift your body story. This will be a fundraiser for organizations that promote body sovereignty. Be sure you’re on the newsletter list to hear more.

posted in Activism / food+body / self-love
November 27, 2016

giftguidemain

Each year I offer up a few suggestions for gift giving. This year I was tempted to suggest we skip gifts all together and just donate money to organizations on the front lines of the threats to the environment, native people and sacred land, LGBTQ community, reproductive rights, quality journalism, public school, Jewish people, Muslims, civil liberties, Black lives, electing women to political office, and so much more. Yet here is what I ultimately believe:

We need to do both. We need to fund the front lines and support small businesses and artists. We need to fund the front lines and, if gift giving is a special tradition, honor that.

So please, fund the front lines first.

Pick one, two or more causes you care about and sign up to donate monthly. Then, if you want, consider a few of the following as worthy of brown paper packaging and string.


gift4

1. Edo Blocks. Because maybe like me, you have a LEGO lover in your life who is ready to step it up.
2. Vagenda Notepad. Because we have a lot to do in the coming year.

gift5

3. The Woman Cards. Because the only thing better than playing cards with friends is having Hillary Clinton, Shirley Chisholm, and Sacagawea on those face of those cards.
4. Leaves And Flowers for Quitokeeto Tumeric Wellness Tea. Because pleasure and calm.

gift3

5. Fidget Cube. Because these are tense times.
6. Everyday Bravery Pins. Because we’re all doing the best we can.

gift2

7. Let’s Talk About Race. Because it’s never too early and the time is now.
8. Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West. Because I just flew for 10 hours and couldn’t put it down.

gift1

9. Penzey’s Double Strength Pure Vanilla Extract. Because Penzey’s stands for love and baking cookies is saving my sanity.
10. Parabo Press 14-month Calendar. Because I’ve been ordering family photo calendars for years and this is above and beyond the best: perforated pages so that you can tear off and save the photos when the month has passed, easy ordering from your phone or tablet, and two bonus months to bridge any gaps.

giftsix

11. CA Makes Hair Pins. Because when we’re fighting the patriarchy we can’t have our hair getting in the way.
12. Fiat Luxe FU Studs. Because.
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13. One Year of Unlimited Tarot Card Readings. Because we all need some help finding our way through 2017.
14. Intersectional Feminist Lapel Pin. Because a more perfect stocking stuffer never did exist. (To learn more about intersectional feminism head over here).

xo, Rachel

posted in things i heart
November 15, 2016

embodiment2

It’s 2 am in my home (11 am in Berlin which is what my body clock is set to which why I’m wide awake) and I’ve just gotten off my yoga mat. I had gotten out of bed to pee and on my way back I felt the urge to go straight for my phone, for Facebook, for the noise.

But what my days need from me now is embodiment.

(If you missed last week’s post “Stay” please read it first, this is a follow-up).

Mind you, it’s not my natural inclination. It’s often easier to check out. Being here, especially now, requires choosing.

But I’m devoted to serving more than ever and so I’m devoted to being in my body. I’m choosing to be here.

Being in my body does not mean I will run a marathon or do Crossfit (though if those are your thing more power to you). This is a commitment to simply keep returning to the sensations and wisdom of my body. Returning in small but meaningful ways.

And yes it’s sometimes painful because I’m in pain. My emotions, just like your emotions, reside in the body. So to feel my body is to feel my feelings–to feel what’s true. What’s true for me now is grief (all the stages) and fire and love.

And I want to add that when I got on my yoga mat I didn’t do any formal yoga poses. I just let my body lead. I stretched and moved in whatever way felt good. I used my foam roller to get out the knots. I reminded my hips, which are the first to clench in the face of distress, that it was safe to open. I patiently massaged an ache on the bottom of both feet.

Being in our bodies doesn’t have to be complicated, or graceful, or formal. Being in our bodies is just an awareness practice. Yes we can be in our bodies sitting still in a chair but sometimes for me, and for most women I know, a little movement, a little stretch, a little wiggle really helps to drop us down.

As a way to support you in being in your body I want to share with you two guided meditations from my Feast masterclass. In the first audio I guide you into your body and into the kind of intuitive movement I just described. In the second I take you on a guided body scan to put you in touch with your body’s hungers (and I’m not talking about food here). In short: I’ll take you there.

If you are living from the neck up…

If you are overwhelmed from the woes and waves of change in the world…

If you are skeptical of or mistrust your body…

If you want to drop into yourself but crave a friend go to along with you…

I invite you to listen to and practice these meditations.

posted in food+body

Hi, I'm Rachel

I am a life coach and fierce advocate for women feeding their truest hungers. I'm also a curator of inspiration and this is where I share the wisdom I've gained, words that trigger deep reflection, and resources to help you live your most well-fed life. Feast onward.

Returning August 2017

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