What I've been chewing on lately...

July 12, 2017
Before You Go On a Diet

Over the last few weeks I’ve had a handful of dinner dates with girlfriends and to my surprise three of them, all on separate meetups, revealed to me that they were dieting.

That might seem normal in our current culture but I somehow believed that my friends knew better and that my teachings had been transmitted to them, directly or indirectly, over the many years we’ve known each other.

As I lay awake a few nights ago I began to ask myself:

Is it that my friends don’t understand what I do? Or better said, in my most indignant huffy voice: “After all these years don’t they agree with and trust my authority on this topic!?”

Is it that my friends are human and just susceptible to the overwhelming amount of weight-loss propaganda we all face?

Is it that in the face of weight gain they just don’t know what else to do? Is it that dieting has become such a knee-jerk response to too-tight pants that we don’t question it, even if our wiser self knows better?

Is it that our world feels like it’s spinning out of control and being on a diet feels safe and secure?

Likely, it’s some combination of all of these factors and more.

But I want to say to them and to anyone who wakes up and feels the siren call of dieting:

Hang on a minute! 

Wait! Before you commit to that diet or start researching Whole30 or reactivating your Weight Watchers account take a breath.

First, because it can’t be said enough: diets don’t work in the long-run and most often ultimately result in weight gain.

“But I’m not doing a diet!” you might say, “I’m just eating clean” or “I’m just watching my portions” or “I’m just giving up sugar.”

If you can mess it up it’s a diet.

If you’re making food choices predominantly with your brain rather than your body, it’s a diet.

If you have to follow rules to get it right, it’s a diet.

If you can google your specific new approach to eating and find a printable meal plan, it’s likely a diet.

When I say diets don’t work I mean they don’t result in long-term weight-loss, but they do have an impact.

Diets are a violence we perpetrate on ourselves no matter the seemingly benign or holy justification we offer up.

They leave us more disconnected from our hunger and fullness cues. They wreck havoc on our bodies. They treat grown adults like children. I could go on. Diets are bad news and best avoided. Oh, and if you’ve been on the diet train for a day or a lifetime, it’s never too late to get off.

Of course, your body is yours. It’s not my place to tell you how to feel about your body or what do with your body. This is an essential truth. And there are other ways than dieting to respond to your body’s increase in size (real or imagined) than restriction, especially when we know it doesn’t work.

A few other key things to remember before I offer up some suggestions:

Weight fluctuation is normal.

Bodies naturally come in a whole range of sizes.

The size of a body says nothing about the person, including how healthy they are.

Many, many people don’t have any accurate sense of their body because of some level of dysmorphia.

Our world is pretty sick and twisted when it comes to how we view and treat body fat and fat people.

Part of how we heal this on a global scale is by individual person after individual person opting out of thin supremacy, dieting culture, and weight stigma.

Many times the urge to diet is more about anxiety management than body size.

If you’ve gained weight recently or just unhappy with your size and you’re open, or even eager to doing something other than diet, here are just a few constructive responses:

  1. Work with an Intuitive Eating, Health-At-Every-Size-oriented coach or nutritionist. If you’d like a referral for your specific needs, shoot me an email.
  2. Read Intuitive Eating and work through the new workbook.
  3. Add some body-positive voices to your social media feeds.
  4. Delete body-negativity from your social media feeds. Unsubscribe. Unfollow. Be ruthless. 
  5. Throw out, give away, or put in storage any clothing that doesn’t fit the body you have right now.
  6. Ditch the scale too.
  7. Buy a few pieces of clothing that you feel great in, including underwear and bras.
  8. Go have fun. Do something, in this body, that makes you feel alive.
  9. Explore size-friendly yoga. Like with Anna, Jessamyn, Dianne, or Dana.
  10. Spend some time in nature. Notice how the trees never care about what you or they look like.
  11. Masturbate.
  12. Flirt.
  13. Cook or buy something that’s a 10 out of 10 on the delicious scale. Eat it with gusto. See if you can notice the moment your body says “Thank you, I’m done for now.”
  14. Download this hunger scale app. Play around. 
  15. Do nothing. Sit still. Hang out with the discomfort. Get curious.
  16. Let your body write you a letter. Write one back.
  17. Ponder body dysmorphia. Are you 100% sure that what you’re seeing is accurate?
  18. Go look at diverse images of the human body and behold the beauty in everyone.
  19. Ponder thin supremacy and how it might be related to your urge to diet.
  20. Ponder patriarchy and how it might be related to your urge to diet.
  21. Ask: if I never lost an ounce again, could I embrace myself and live my life fully?
  22. Ask: What does dieting distract me from?
  23. Join Feast.
  24. Reflect on past attempts at weight loss. Notice that they never ‘worked’.
  25. Ask: What in my life might be causing me to feel anxious or out of control?
  26. Listen to as many episodes of Food Psych as you can.

Dieting might feel like the logical response to feeling out of sorts in your body, or when your jeans don’t fit, or when eating feels out of control, but it’s a dead-end in the long run. The good news is that there is help and there are other ways that result in feeling better in your skin, more at peace with food, and more available to live your meaningful and full life.


A final note: this stuff is messy and multifaceted. Don’t believe anyone who tells you it’s simple or 1-2-3. What I’ve written here is just a first pass and not a one-size-fits-all directive. It’s complicated to have a body. It’s complicated to be a woman (cis or otherwise). It’s complicated when the world you live in tells you that because of your body or what your body might become you’re not worthy. It’s complicated, or it can be, to come back to your body when so many forces have driven you from it. I have so much care for all this complexity and the real and diverse human experiences that make up the body liberation/positive movement.

Hi, I'm Rachel

I am a life coach and fierce advocate for women feeding their truest hungers. I'm also a curator of inspiration and this is where I share the wisdom I've gained, words that trigger deep reflection, and resources to help you live your most well-fed life. Feast onward.

Returning August 2017

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