May 12, 2017

Last week I met with a new client who struggles with perfectionism and she mentioned that she had recently decided to watch a movie late on a “school night”, even though she “knew better” and when she found herself tired at work the next day her logical conclusion was “I’m bad.” I’m bad as in, “I’m irresponsible, I’m not trustworthy, I make bad decisions” etc.

Hearing the order of events (watch a movie late → feel tired next day at work → conclude badness) it felt like she took a huge stratospheric leap between step A and C. And yet, this is a leap I hear women make all the time. Every week they lay their sins at my feet as evidence of their personal failings.

Here are just a few of the things that women I’ve worked with have told me is evidence of their personal, innate ‘badness’:

  • I ate the second box of cookies even though I knew I wasn’t hungry
  • I lashed out at my partner who was just trying to help me.
  • I missed an important deadline at work.
  • I’m fat.
  • Unbeknownst to me, I used an offensive term that hurt someone.
  • I talked down to a friend of mine.
  • My kid hit another kid at school.
  • I bought a new pair of shoes when I don’t really have the money for them.
  • I went on a date with someone I really liked but then they didn’t want to go on a second date with me.
  • I’m (insert age) years old and I still haven’t (insert life achievement) yet.
  • I don’t know how to ask for what I want in bed.
  • I didn’t speak up at my annual review and ask for the raise I know I deserve.
  • I was sexually assaulted and didn’t report it.
  • I just quit a well-paying job and don’t know what’s next for me.
  • I don’t want kids.
  • I didn’t vote in the last election.
  • I haven’t saved for retirement.
  • I’m, according to my doctor, ‘obese’
  • I just had to buy a bigger pants size.
  • I tried to do Whole30/Weight Watchers/Paleo and fell off the wagon.
  • I laid on the couch all weekend watching reruns of Seinfeld.
  • I have a partner who earns enough that I don’t have to work and so I don’t work.
  • I had work to do but I took a nap instead.
  • I slept with the guy on the first date even though I didn’t really want to.
  • I have a to-list a mile long and instead of doing anything productive I went to the movies
  • My house is filthy

And so it goes. On and on.

As you can see it’s pretty easy, by these measures, to be ‘bad’

So what’s wrong with labeling ourselves as bad?

It’s a dead-end.

It asks of us no curiosity or compassion. It leaves no room for nuance or humanity.

And importantly it doesn’t engender a different outcome, should you want that, next time.

There is nothing that inspires me less to make changes than feeling bad about myself. I have never and will never change my behavior in a lasting and wholesome way as a result of feeling like I’m not enough or because I berated myself.

Nevermind that it’s not true. “I am bad” is not an accurate description what’s going on and why we act the way we do.

So if we’re not bad then what are we? What’s the alternative?

We are human and the alternative is to look at ourselves through the lenses of compassion and curiosity.

When self-compassion has seeped into our bones and we’ve found ourselves nestled firmly amongst the family of bumbling humans something extraordinary happens: “because I’m bad” either ceases to be an option for explaining anything or it scarcely makes an appearance. (I’ll get into what replaces it down below.)

If “I’m bad” or some variation of it still show up on your list of possible explanations for your behavior, choices, life, experiences, or appearance then today I’m inviting you to, at least temporarily, in the name of experimentation, remove it. (Seriously, what if you couldn’t explain anything with that?!)

If you ask me what my work is about I will mention “hungers” and “women” and “feasting on your life”, but at the root, my work is really about how we relate to ourselves. When we are in an allied relationship with ourselves we trust our hungers and seek to feed them. When we are in an oppositional relationship to ourselves we mistrust our hungers and seek to numb, deny or minimize them.

This most essential relationship, the one we have with ourselves, also determines the lens through which we view all of our actions. If we’re not on the same team as ourselves, if on the inside we’re both the ‘good guy judge’ and the ‘flawed bad guy’ then “I’m bad” is a common conclusion to make.

When we’ve come to see that all parts of ourselves are welcome, that all parts of make sense, that there is no bad guy, and that we’re no better or worse (though equally special) to all humans we no longer find “I’m bad” on the list of ways to explain our actions.

So what happens when “I’m bad” isn’t an option?

What you find is a whole host of doors open up. You find immense compassion not just for yourself but for every human who is also wading through the muck of life.

It’s important to note that this isn’t a get out of jail free card. This isn’t how we justify behaving badly. This is how we see nuance. This is how we get to the root of what’s going on and what it means to be human. This is how we gain deeper insight into our own patterns and increase our sense of choice.

So, you might be wondering: “If I’m not bad then what’s going on?”

The most common answer, in my experience, is nothing.

Nothing is going on because the action is something any normal, imperfect human might do. Try it on for size: “I did X because I’m human. The end.” In these cases the only thing that needs to change is us embracing our own humanness, seeing ourselves within the family of humans, and holding ourselves to more human standards.

This one most often comes up around productivity and rest. The need for more sleep.The never-ending to-do list. The dirty house and unfolded laundry. All of these are typical areas for women to label themselves as lacking, when in fact, they are just human. Regular human, not superhuman. Join the club.

Other ways you might explain or interpret your behavior that don’t assign core not-enoughness include:

  • Because…I’m hurting and I didn’t know a better way to cope with it. (humans hurt sometimes and we don’t always use or have a robust coping toolkit)
  • Because I’m scared. (humans get scared)
  • Because I was checked out. (humans do that sometimes)
  • Because I wasn’t informed/awake. (humans have blind spots)
  • Because I was/am struggling to balance two or more competing needs. (humans have a lot of layers and often our needs rub against each other)
  • Because I was caught in my own illusions. (being human = egoic illusions that need to be worked through)
  • Because I was chasing love/safety and part of me thought I could find it if I did X (humans need love and safety and will do a lot of stuff to get any semblance of it.)
  • Because I was trying to live up to an unrealistic, inhumane standard. (humans, especially women humans, are expected to live up to a lot of impossible stuff)
  • Because I goofed. (humans goof up)
  • Because I was triggered (humans get triggered)
  • Because I was tired (humans get tired)
  • Because I behaved badly. (humans do that sometimes)

I’m not saying that given a do-over you wouldn’t, sometimes, go back and do some things differently. I am saying that there needs to be room for you to be human and for your very human actions not to be interpreted as you being deficient, bad, lacking, or not enough in any way.

Who you are is not what you do. What you do is a result of being an imperfect human with the level of consciousness, connection and healing you have at a given moment.

This means I can reject your behavior and not be rejecting you.
This means you can behave ‘badly’ and not be ‘bad’

This shift in lenses also means, again, that we can have a better understanding of why we behaved in a certain way and then have more space, thanks to compassion, to either accept ourselves or make a different choice next time.

There is no part of you that’s the enemy, that can’t be trusted, or that’s out to get you. There are just parts of you to be understood better, listened to more deeply, possibly healed, and ultimately, and always, loved.

If you want to know where to find these unwelcomed parts of yourself, here are a few places to look:

  1. Where do you feel less than other people or commonly compare yourself only to find most often that you rank below others?
  2. If I asked you to tell me all the ways you’re not living up to where you should be, what would you say? Where would you say you fall short? (I hope it’s clear I would never seriously ask you this question)
  3. Straight up: in what areas are you a bad mother, wife, friend, daughter, employee, etc.? (again, not a question I would ask because I disagree with the premise, but a good one to spark your awareness)

Your answers to all three of these questions will shed light on places you might offer some more compassion towards, you might let go of superhuman expectations, find a loving motivation to make changes, or simply seek to understand before you condemn.

I highly recommend the following books if this is a topic that feels alive for you:

There is Nothing Wrong with You: Going Beyond Self-Hate by Cheri Huber
Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of the Buddha by Tara Brach

Hi, I'm Rachel

I am a life coach and fierce advocate for women feeding their truest hungers. I'm also a curator of inspiration and this is where I share the wisdom I've gained, words that trigger deep reflection, and resources to help you live your most well-fed life. Feast onward.

Returning August 2017

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