September 11, 2016

hspus

I was just a few months into dating my now fiancé and we were returning from a day trip.

I was tired.

He was all of the sudden excited. “Oh! I want to take you some place!” he exclaimed.

“I’m pretty tired” I replied, struggling to find my clear “No thank you. Take me home please.”

It’s called the Warehouse Cafe though it’s much more warehouse than cafe.

Walking into this dive bar, so dark that it took more than a minute for our eyes to adjust from the afternoon light, I immediately felt awash in sadness. Not my own sadness, but the sadness of the people there. Hunched over the bar, nursing a drink that was far from their first of the day. They were sad. Not even outwardly sad, but emanating sadness nonetheless, and I could feel it.

It washed over me like a cloud of cigarette smoke and made it just as hard to breathe.

Returning with drinks for us Justin beamed with that ‘Isn’t this place cool!’ look in his eyes.

“I need to get out of here” I responded as tears welled up in my eyes and my breath got short.

Wandering out back amidst a crowd of rowdy bikers we found a place to sit and I started to cry.

Needless to say he was perplexed.

Why had walking into a bar—a bar he was excited to take me to—made me cry?

I tried to explain.“The people in there.” Wiping away tears. “They are so sad. I can feel it.”

Now he was annoyed. I seemed crazy to him and his mind flashed forward to what life might be like with me, unable to ever set foot in a cool dive bar, too sensitive to have any fun. Or so he feared.

Underneath it all he was disappointed. I had popped his balloon.

Nothing I could say in the moment helped me make sense to him.

He was annoyed and I was outraged.

How could he not understand?! How could his first reaction to my upset not be compassion?!

No one spoke on the drive home and when he pulled up in front my apartment I got out, slammed the door, and he sped off.

We’d had our first big fight.


In the years since then I’ve come to understand several important things about myself, sensitivity, and relationships.

First, I am a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) and I was born this way.

Just like dogs can pick up on sounds and smells that humans cannot detect, HSPs can pick up on a whole range of stimuli that non-HSPs are often oblivious to. This makes us powerful. This temperament is a form of intelligence. We’re also the target of messages that we’re weak and too sensitive. Not so. Being an HSP is an asset despite the fact that our dominant culture doesn’t see it that way.

In my masterclass Feast we spend an entire week focusing on high sensitivity because it’s such an important cornerstone in the journey to make peace with food. Often a student will tell me they are an “emotional eater” but what they describe is an overstimulated highly sensitive person using food to calm their nervous system. The more my students understand what it means to be an HSP, shake off any shame of their sensitivities, and take care of their unique needs, the faster the choppy waters of eating stills.

The three aspects of self-care for HSPs are prevention, mitigation, and recovery. Prevention looks like making choices to avoid or modify situations in advance that are overwhelming to our nervous systems. Mitigation looks like being in the middle of an overstimulating situation and doing what you can to make it better. Recovery looks like preparing for and acknowledging that after an overstimulating event our nervous systems are asking us to actively participate in self-soothing.

As an HSP our role in relationship is that of educator. It is our task to teach others about our temperament, our needs, and importantly, about the myths and stigma surrounding sensitivity. It’s just fact that most people aren’t yet familiar with the term or definition of HSP. It’s on us to teach them both directly through words and indirectly by role-modeling how we treat our own sensitivities.

Four years after that tearful trip, Justin has a deep understanding of my sensitivities and a respect for the gifts they bring. Yes, he has moments of frustration but they are minimal and assuaged by all he knows now.

Recently Feast students asked about dating as an HSP, afraid that they would always be perceived as “too much” by any suitor. Rather than speak for him I asked Justin to share a little bit of his experience and this is what he had to say:

What would you tell a guy friend who said he was dating a someone who is an HSP? What advice would you give him?

Learn to be patient. It’s easy to overwhelm an HSP, and you need to slow down and most of the time, lower your voice.

Sometimes what triggers Rachel doesn’t make sense to me, and you just need to understand that it’s her own experience, and you just need to accept and respect it.

What would you tell a single female friend who was trying to navigate finding a partner as an HSP? She feels ashamed and afraid any partner would find her sensitivity a burden. What would you tell her?

Be yourself, and be honest with your partners. Either they get it, or they don’t. Don’t hide those feelings just to spare yourself embarrassment.

What’s been the best thing about dating an HSP?

Letting me tap into my own sensitivities, and knowing that you (Rachel) understand me and can empathize, no matter how odd or off-kilter my feelings might seem.

What’s been the hardest?

Missing out on going out to clubs, loud bars, dancing, drinking. Crowded places are hard, places that most of the time I wouldn’t have a hard time with.

What do you see me (Rachel) doing in terms of my own HSP tendencies that make dating me easier?

I see you try hard and put up with things you might not have been comfortable with before, like sometimes putting yourself in crowded/loud social situations you might have avoided in the past.

What do you do to make dating me (Rachel), an HSP, easier?

Accept the fact that you’re special and that I should treat you unlike any other woman I’ve been with before in my life.


Relationships don’t come built straight out of the box. They come as a pile of incomplete pieces that you, with your combined strengths and challenges, work to put together and when you need a missing part you have to work as a team to find it. As an HSP a few things make it easier to assemble a truly great partnership: 

  • Learn about your unique temperament
  • Exorcise any internalized shame you might have about being an HSP
  • Develop your own personalized ways of preventing, mitigating, and recovering from overstimulation
  • Respect your boundaries 
  • Assume the role of educator in relationships

Photo Credit: Rachelle Derouin

 

Hi, I'm Rachel

I am a life coach and fierce advocate for women feeding their truest hungers. I'm also a curator of inspiration and this is where I share the wisdom I've gained, words that trigger deep reflection, and resources to help you live your most well-fed life. Feast onward.

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